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GI Show – Overwatch’s Review, Kirby, Uncharted 4 Game Club

The Game Informer Show hits a milestone this week with its big 300th episode, so to celebrate we packed this episode with some real good stuff. To kick things off, Dan Tack joins the show to give the final word on what makes Blizzard's Overwatch worthy of our highest score. After that we have Kyle Hilliard and Jeff Cork to talk about the new Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutants in Manhattan from Platinum Games and why Kirby: Planet Robobot's ending makes it a keeper on 3DS. We also get to hear Tack's thoughts on the new strategy game Total War: Warhammer. In the back half of the show, we finally get around to our GI Game Club for Uncharted 4: A Thief's End and break down the first ten chapters of the game in great detail. We're covering the rest of the game on this podcast on June 9th episode, so feel free to send emails into [email protected] with your thoughts on the entire game!

You can watch the video below, subscribe and listen to the audio on iTunes, or listen to episode 300 on SoundCloud. Also, be sure to send your emails to [email protected] for a chance to have them answered on the show and win a prize by becoming email of the Week!

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Our thanks to the talented Super Marcato Bros. for The Game Informer Show's intro song. You can hear more of their original tunes and awesome video game music podcast at their website.

To jump to a particular point in the discussion, check out the time stamps below.

4:00 – Dan Tack's thoughts on Overwatch
23:55 – Kirby: Planet Robobot
30:50 – Replaying Uncharted 1-3
36:08 – Platinum's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Mutants in Manhattan
44:10 – Total War: Warhammer
48:20 – Community emails
1:05:15 – Our first GI Game Club for Uncharted 4: A Thief's End's first 10 chapters

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Uncharted Gets Amazing Real-Life Recreation

Uncharted is one of the biggest releases of the year. It's clear that the game took a lot of time an effort to make. This real-life reenactment of the game also took a lot of effort. How's that for a cheap transition?

We're not joking around, this real life version of Uncharted 4 from Freakin Rad is freaking impressive. If you like this, you'll love the actual game (read the review here), which we think sets a new high bar for storytelling.

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Why Naughty Dog removed ‘fun’ from its Uncharted 4 focus tests

In a conversation with nascent games hub Glixel, Uncharted 4 creative director Neil Druckmann talks “fun” and how the notion of making a game “fun” can get in the way of enjoyment. …


Gamasutra News

Uncharted 4 Sells 2.7 Million Copies In First Week

Sony has announced that Uncharted 4 is its fastest-selling first-party PlayStation 4 game in North America. The company has touted impressive first-week sales numbers for Nathan Drake’s last ride.

More than 2.7 million copies have been sold through as of May 16. This includes retail copies sold at register and PlayStation Store downloads.

By comparison, Naughty Dog’s last game, The Last of Us, sold 3.4 million copies in its first three weeks. For more on Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End, check out our review

[Source: PlayStation Blog]

 

Our Take
I’ve only played about a third of Uncharted 4 at this point, but it’s living up to my expectations. It’s not going to be easy for me to say goodbye to this cast, but if Naughty Dog thinks its time to move on, I’d rather they do so gracefully instead of milk the franchise unenthusiastically.

With sales like this though, it's going to be interesting to see if Sony can keep itself from simply assigning another studio. The lure of fortune is hard to resist, after all.

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Get Ready For Our Game Club On Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End

Last month, in the final installment of our GI Game Club covering Final Fantasy VII, we announced that our next game to dissect and discuss would be Uncharted 4: A Thief's End. With the game's release today amidst a glowing reaction from critics, here's the latest info on how you can participate.

On The Game Informer Show podcast airing May 26th, a group of Game Informer editors will be going in-depth on Uncharted 4: A Thief's End up through chapter 10. This is roughly half-way through the game and will be our stopping point until the next discussion. We will not spoil anything beyond the tenth chapter in that first discussion. The point of the GI Game Club is to play games alongside the community, so we strongly encourage people to play up until that point as well and send in questions, thoughts, or discussion topics to [email protected] before May 25th.

To get the ball rolling on some discussion points, feel free to write in to [email protected]  on the following topics…

- How well does the beginning of the game re-establish who these characters are? Does Uncharted 4 depend on knowledge from previous entries?

- In the first ten chapters, how much does the game change/add to your impression or your previous knowledge of returning characters?

- Do the dialogue decisions add anything of value?

- How much do you enjoy the gameplay of Uncharted 4 versus the writing?

- What are the little touches in this game's design/animation/writing that separate Naughty Dog from other developers? 

- How do you think the production of The Last of Us has influenced Uncharted 4: A Thief's End?

- What is the best moment from the first ten chapters of the game?

We can't wait to dive into Nathan Drake's latest adventure with you all, so please subscribe to The Game Informer Show and join in on the discussion. Happy treasure hunting!

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Uncharted 4 Patch Addresses Crashes And Adds Tweaks To Multiplayer

A new patch (1.03) and update (.013) are now live for Uncharted 4.

Nathan Drake's final adventure released this past week on PS4. Both the patch and update address minor issues from launch, from gameplay crashes to multiplayer tweaks. Naughty Dog has released the full patch notes on their website, which you can view below. 

Uncharted 4 – PS4 Patch 1.03 Notes

1.03.012

General:

  • Various Localization updates

Single Player:

  • Fixed various crashes
  • Fixed particle sync issue

Multiplayer:

  • General
    • Gameplay crash fixes
    • Fix for Entitlement Limits being reached causing users to not see Uncharted Points they had purchased
    • Enabled a pop-up to appear while in the menus to inform users of new updates
    • Fix for Challenge completed pop-up appearing after already completing the challenge
    • Fix for Loadout Point unlocks not triggering properly
    • Fix for store item descriptions
    • Leaderboard text fixes
    • Fix for post-game medal description
    • Added Leaderboards menu item to matchmaking page so players can check out their leaderboard stats while in matchmaking
    • Fixed booster level issue for late-joiners
    • Sniper Sidekick – Path of Indra mod now plays sound properly when Sniper teleports
    • Timer display error fix for Matchmaking lobby
    • Fix for private match settings not being visible after viewing previous game results
    • Fixed crash that can occur during the end game scoreboard
  • Ranked TDM
    • Fix for team favor display for when teams are evenly matched in Ranked TDM
    • Fix for rank point bug where players were incorrectly getting penalized for both win/loss
    • Rank progress is now displayed when browsing the Ranked TDM playlist, before entering
    • Lowered the max rank that can be achieved after initial placement matches from Gold I to Gold III
  • Command
    • Fix for a crash that occurs during a game of Command
    • Fix for store prices sometimes being improper while being a Captain
    • Fix for contested status icon not updating properly
    • Fix for late-join player seeing improper status icon
  • Plunder
    • Fix for the idol respawn timer not appearing properly
    • Fix for weapon gameplay issues while hodling the idol
    • Treasure chest, player starting spawns, & idol spawn locations tweaked
    • Fix for idol pickup causing loss of functionality
    • Fix for scoring animation playing improperly
    • Fix for throwing animation playing improperly
  • Weapons
    • Fix for sniper rifle scope-in times
    • Fix for weapon progression being inappropriately earned
    • Fix for starting ammo mod on some weapons
  • Mysticals
    • Spirit of the Djinn
      • Fix for timer not working properly
      • Fix for FX not deactivating properly
      • Fix for improperly turning off during to network errors
      • Fix for icon not clearing properly when a player dies while it is active
      • Fix for not being able to purchase while wating to respawn
    • Staff of Ayar Manco received a decrease in the ammount of points it contributes towards your Support Score

1.03.013 (MP ONLY)

  • Decrease number of Warm-Up matches to unlock other playlists to 1 game
  • Decreased the maximum Warm-Up matches from 10 to 5
  • Tripled the Rank Points lost for a quit or disconnect in Ranked TDM

If ever you experience issues with the game, you can let Naughty Dog know here. For more on Uncharted 4, click the banner below for coverage from our February cover story. Read our review here and find out if you should play the rest of the series first before jumping in.

[Source: Naughty Dog via Twitter]

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Should You Play The Rest Of The Series Before Playing Uncharted 4?

This feature was originally published May 10, 2016.

Uncharted 4 just hit stores today and is by all accounts a fantastic adventure game. However, given it's the fourth entry in the series, there might be some apprehension for newcomers who haven't played the other games in the series. Fellow editor Andrew Reiner and I decided to hash it out and try and figure out just how necessary it is to have played the previous games to appreciate Naughty Dog's latest.

Javy Gwaltney: So Uncharted 4, after several delays and much anticipation, is finally out. Your review suggests you really enjoyed it, Reiner.

Andrew Reiner: After spending so much time with Nathan Drake throughout the years, it’s a little bittersweet to see it come to an end, but I’m glad Naughty Dog decided to send him off in style rather than continue on like Indiana Jones has. Part of me wishes the development team would go back on that decision a decade from now, given just how much fun these games can be, but Uncharted 4’s ending is so well scripted and so heavy in heart that I can’t see them ever revisiting this universe. It’s a hell of a sendoff and a hell of a game to boot.

JG: Yeah, it’s interesting to me because I’m kind of coming at it from the opposite angle. I did not care for the three Uncharted games before this that much, outside of Uncharted 2, and was never really invested in these characters beyond enjoying the occasional, well-landed witty remark. However, I just finished 4 last night and I’m a huge fan of this game. I just really dig it a lot. And I know there are a number of people who are kind of in my position with not liking Uncharted but being curious about 4 because they really dug The Last of Us or they just want something that looks nice and shiny for their PS4, so I figured we should talk about just how necessary playing the other three games is to enjoying the latest one.

AR: That all depends on how much emotional investment you want to have. I tell people it’s similar to seeing Star Wars: The Force Awakens without seeing any other Star Wars film before it. Now, that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but when it comes to character growth, I think we see similar arcs in Uncharted as we do to Star Wars. There isn’t so much a defined light and dark side that is easy to pinpoint like in Luke Skywalker’s arc, but Drake is just as conflicted of a character, and I think a lot of that comes from his past. Uncharted 4 is written in a way that allows newcomers to jump in and understand and enjoy it – the narrative and characters are clearly defined – but has more impact for people who have seen these treasure hunters through from start to finish. You aren’t missing any earth-shattering events in their lives, but it is very much the fourth chapter with them, and we’ve seen most of them grow in that time.  

JG: Sure, it’s definitely a closing chapter to the series that brings resolution to the arcs of these characters, but at the same time I don’t think it’s really necessary to go through the whole series if you’ve never been through it before just to play this game and get a lot out of it. There will be callbacks you probably won’t get, but nothing major, and – this is gonna sound like a harsh criticism but it isn’t – Nate and the gang are pretty easy to figure out. They’re basically characters from an Indiana Jones movie: thrillseekers, mentors to thrillseekers, rivals, and so on. And the fourth game does a good job of building something out of those archetypes, especially with the villains. Nadine and Rafe are the first antagonists in the whole series I think are anywhere near memorable. And of course, you know, for this we’re talking about more than just Uncharted 4. We have to assess whether the others have aged well enough to be worth playing through to get to 4, and as someone who replayed all of them recently in the HD collection: I don’t think that’s the case. What about you?

AR: The fourth installment, while serving as a conclusion for Drake and his extended family, is just as much a new chapter. You’re right, Nadine and Rafe are the series’ most interesting foils, and they have never been mentioned before in any other installment. The same goes for Sam Drake, Nate’s lost brother who miraculously escaped death. Your point of them being Indiana Jones characters is also valid, but I still would be mighty disappointed if I watched Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade first. You go on a journey with these characters. You see what they endure and what they sacrifice. Although the script may not give them much rope, you learn so much about them and latch onto their personalities. For people who are looking at Uncharted 4 being their first Uncharted game, that’s a tough question to answer. I know it will cost a bit more, but I think you owe it to yourself to try playing the first game before jumping into the final one. You said you didn’t care about the characters that much in the first three games, but I did. I think that’s the big difference here. I bonded with them. You didn’t.

JG: Yeah, that’s definitely fair. To me, Uncharted has always been about the spectacle of it all: the explosions, the ridiculous number of times that Nate can narrowly avoid plunging to his death. But what makes Uncharted 4 interesting to me is that it’s the first in the series that combines that with a story I find constantly engaging on nearly every level: from Nate’s familial troubles to the treasure hunt itself. And I think it would just be a bummer for someone to start up Uncharted 1 or 2, find the games haven’t aged well, and then just not ever play 4 because, holy crap, 4 is fantastic. It’s the first Uncharted game for me that I don’t think will really have a shelf life. I can see myself replaying this in the years to come, which just isn’t something that’s going to happen with any of the other three.

AR: I’ll go back to Star Wars. Yoda doesn’t look great. He’s clearly a puppet, but there’s storytelling magic there, and I think the first three Uncharted games deliver plenty of their own. I don’t want people to shy away from jumping into Uncharted 4, if they see that as their starting point, but I do want them to give this some thought. There’s one sequence in particular in Uncharted 4, in an attic, that is a stroll through the entire series – which is meant as a moment for Drake and the player to reflect on the great adventures up to this point. That moment will just be time filler without context. Yes, you’ll learn where Drake went and what prizes were found, but the flood of memories won’t be there. I haven’t gone back and played the first three games recently, but that moment in the attic was powerful and different – a moment of reflection we rarely see in games.

JG: Right, that flood of memories is often what makes experiencing the end of a story so great. Man, it’s just a hard thing because those other games have not aged well at all but you are right: all of them have moments that really stand out and are kind of astonishing, like the opening with the dangling train in Uncharted 2. But new players can always go back, you know? I did that with Mass Effect 2 actually. Played through that first and loved it so much that I went through the first game. I honestly don’t know if I would have fallen in love with that series as much as I did if I had played through the first one right off the bat. It’s a hard thing to figure out but I do think that Uncharted 4 does stand on its own and can be a great time for newcomers.

AR: I don’t like the way you approach serialized games, but I do agree with you that you can appreciate most of Uncharted 4 without knowing who Nathan Drake is going into it. This universe is easy to figure out. It’s not like going into the final chapter of Harry Potter blind, which I suspect would be like an acid trip. Uncharted is simple in storytelling scope, but a lot of it falls upon developing the characters. Naughty Dog has done a tremendous job of doing that throughout the years. Just think about how much that means to you in other stories you’ve enjoyed before diving into Uncharted 4.

Learn more about Reiner's thoughts on Uncharted 4 in this recent Test Chamber.

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Should You Play The Rest Of The Series Before Playing Uncharted 4?

Uncharted 4 just hit stores today and is by all accounts a fantastic adventure game. However, given it's the fourth entry in the series, there might be some apprehension for newcomers who haven't played the other games in the series. Fellow editor Andrew Reiner and I decided to hash it out and try and figure out just how necessary it is to have played the previous games to appreciate Naughty Dog's latest.

Javy Gwaltney: So Uncharted 4, after several delays and much anticipation, is finally out. Your review suggests you really enjoyed it, Reiner.

Andrew Reiner: After spending so much time with Nathan Drake throughout the years, it’s a little bittersweet to see it come to an end, but I’m glad Naughty Dog decided to send him off in style rather than continue on like Indiana Jones has. Part of me wishes the development team would go back on that decision a decade from now, given just how much fun these games can be, but Uncharted 4’s ending is so well scripted and so heavy in heart that I can’t see them ever revisiting this universe. It’s a hell of a sendoff and a hell of a game to boot.

JG: Yeah, it’s interesting to me because I’m kind of coming at it from the opposite angle. I did not care for the three Uncharted games before this that much, outside of Uncharted 2, and was never really invested in these characters beyond enjoying the occasional, well-landed witty remark. However, I just finished 4 last night and I’m a huge fan of this game. I just really dig it a lot. And I know there are a number of people who are kind of in my position with not liking Uncharted but being curious about 4 because they really dug The Last of Us or they just want something that looks nice and shiny for their PS4, so I figured we should talk about just how necessary playing the other three games is to enjoying the latest one.

AR: That all depends on how much emotional investment you want to have. I tell people it’s similar to seeing Star Wars: The Force Awakens without seeing any other Star Wars film before it. Now, that’s a bit of an exaggeration, but when it comes to character growth, I think we see similar arcs in Uncharted as we do to Star Wars. There isn’t so much a defined light and dark side that is easy to pinpoint like in Luke Skywalker’s arc, but Drake is just as conflicted of a character, and I think a lot of that comes from his past. Uncharted 4 is written in a way that allows newcomers to jump in and understand and enjoy it – the narrative and characters are clearly defined – but has more impact for people who have seen these treasure hunters through from start to finish. You aren’t missing any earth-shattering events in their lives, but it is very much the fourth chapter with them, and we’ve seen most of them grow in that time.  

JG: Sure, it’s definitely a closing chapter to the series that brings resolution to the arcs of these characters, but at the same time I don’t think it’s really necessary to go through the whole series if you’ve never been through it before just to play this game and get a lot out of it. There will be callbacks you probably won’t get, but nothing major, and – this is gonna sound like a harsh criticism but it isn’t – Nate and the gang are pretty easy to figure out. They’re basically characters from an Indiana Jones movie: thrillseekers, mentors to thrillseekers, rivals, and so on. And the fourth game does a good job of building something out of those archetypes, especially with the villains. Nadine and Rafe are the first antagonists in the whole series I think are anywhere near memorable. And of course, you know, for this we’re talking about more than just Uncharted 4. We have to assess whether the others have aged well enough to be worth playing through to get to 4, and as someone who replayed all of them recently in the HD collection: I don’t think that’s the case. What about you?

AR: The fourth installment, while serving as a conclusion for Drake and his extended family, is just as much a new chapter. You’re right, Nadine and Rafe are the series’ most interesting foils, and they have never been mentioned before in any other installment. The same goes for Sam Drake, Nate’s lost brother who miraculously escaped death. Your point of them being Indiana Jones characters is also valid, but I still would be mighty disappointed if I watched Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade first. You go on a journey with these characters. You see what they endure and what they sacrifice. Although the script may not give them much rope, you learn so much about them and latch onto their personalities. For people who are looking at Uncharted 4 being their first Uncharted game, that’s a tough question to answer. I know it will cost a bit more, but I think you owe it to yourself to try playing the first game before jumping into the final one. You said you didn’t care about the characters that much in the first three games, but I did. I think that’s the big difference here. I bonded with them. You didn’t.

JG: Yeah, that’s definitely fair. To me, Uncharted has always been about the spectacle of it all: the explosions, the ridiculous number of times that Nate can narrowly avoid plunging to his death. But what makes Uncharted 4 interesting to me is that it’s the first in the series that combines that with a story I find constantly engaging on nearly every level: from Nate’s familial troubles to the treasure hunt itself. And I think it would just be a bummer for someone to start up Uncharted 1 or 2, find the games haven’t aged well, and then just not ever play 4 because, holy crap, 4 is fantastic. It’s the first Uncharted game for me that I don’t think will really have a shelf life. I can see myself replaying this in the years to come, which just isn’t something that’s going to happen with any of the other three.

AR: I’ll go back to Star Wars. Yoda doesn’t look great. He’s clearly a puppet, but there’s storytelling magic there, and I think the first three Uncharted games deliver plenty of their own. I don’t want people to shy away from jumping into Uncharted 4, if they see that as their starting point, but I do want them to give this some thought. There’s one sequence in particular in Uncharted 4, in an attic, that is a stroll through the entire series – which is meant as a moment for Drake and the player to reflect on the great adventures up to this point. That moment will just be time filler without context. Yes, you’ll learn where Drake went and what prizes were found, but the flood of memories won’t be there. I haven’t gone back and played the first three games recently, but that moment in the attic was powerful and different – a moment of reflection we rarely see in games.

JG: Right, that flood of memories is often what makes experiencing the end of a story so great. Man, it’s just a hard thing because those other games have not aged well at all but you are right: all of them have moments that really stand out and are kind of astonishing, like the opening with the dangling train in Uncharted 2. But new players can always go back, you know? I did that with Mass Effect 2 actually. Played through that first and loved it so much that I went through the first game. I honestly don’t know if I would have fallen in love with that series as much as I did if I had played through the first one right off the bat. It’s a hard thing to figure out but I do think that Uncharted 4 does stand on its own and can be a great time for newcomers.

AR: I don’t like the way you approach serialized games, but I do agree with you that you can appreciate most of Uncharted 4 without knowing who Nathan Drake is going into it. This universe is easy to figure out. It’s not like going into the final chapter of Harry Potter blind, which I suspect would be like an acid trip. Uncharted is simple in storytelling scope, but a lot of it falls upon developing the characters. Naughty Dog has done a tremendous job of doing that throughout the years. Just think about how much that means to you in other stories you’ve enjoyed before diving into Uncharted 4.

Learn more about Reiner's thoughts on Uncharted 4 in this recent Test Chamber.

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Get Ready For Our Game Club On Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End

Last month, in the final installment of our GI Game Club covering Final Fantasy VII, we announced that our next game to dissect and discuss would be Uncharted 4: A Thief's End. With the game's release today amidst a glowing reaction from critics, here's the latest info on how you can participate.

On The Game Informer Show podcast airing May 26th, a group of Game Informer editors will be going in-depth on Uncharted 4: A Thief's End up through chapter 10. This is roughly half-way through the game and will be our stopping point until the next discussion. We will not spoil anything beyond the tenth chapter in that first discussion. The point of the GI Game Club is to play games alongside the community, so we strongly encourage people to play up until that point as well and send in questions, thoughts, or discussion topics to [email protected] before May 25th.

We can't wait to dive into Nathan Drake's latest adventure with you all, so please subscribe to The Game Informer Show and join in on the discussion. Happy treasure hunting!

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Uncharted 4 Has One Of The Coolest Surprises Yet

Before you proceed any further, here's your SPOILER warning. This video contains a story moment that is best experienced by playing the game. Seriously, if you have the opportunity to play the game tomorrow, next week, or even a year from now, leave this story now.

For those of you who don't care and just want to see how clever Naughty Dog can be, click play and enjoy the moment. I won't give any other build up for it other than it shows us that Naughty Dog has a great sense of and finds a way to kind of break the fourth wall in the process. It's a hell of a moment in the story that actually holds a lot of meaning by the time the credits roll.

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