Master of The Free World Productions | Jumpcut Entertainment Network

‘The Odds That We’re In Base Reality Is One In Billions,’ Says Tesla Founder Elon Musk

Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla Motors, was asked a question during a interview at the Code Conference that sought his opinion on whether there was a possibility life was an elaborate simulation created by a sufficiently advanced civilization. Put more simply, could life just be a video game?

Musk notes that in a short span of 40 years, our own technological advances have allowed the basic building blocks of Pong to evolve into the almost lifelike graphics within virtual reality. He predicts that due to the current rate of progress, games will likely become indistinguishable from reality. Thus, for Musk, the possibility of humankind currently residing in a base reality is one in billions. "That seems to be clearly what it suggests," Musk said. "And arguably we should hope that that's true, because otherwise if civilization stops advancing, then that may be due to some calamitous event that erases civilization."  

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You can watch the entirety of the interview here, where Musk also predicts colonists will reach Mars by 2025. 

We want to know what you think. Could life just be a masterfully crafted game of The Sims?

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Bonus Black Ops III Zombie Map ‘The Giant’ Is Now Available For Stand-Alone Purchase

Now every Call of Duty: Black Ops III player can have the opportunity to play bonus zombie map The Giant, as it now available as a stand-alone purchase for $ 5.99.

It was previously only available as a bonus that was included with Call of Duty: Black Ops III Juggernog Edition, Hardened Edition, Digital Deluxe Editions, and part of the season pass. Now all zombie fans can pick up the story where it was left after the Black Ops II's Origins map.   

Returning to characters such as Dempsey, Nikolai, Richtofen and Takeo, The Giant is a remake of the Der Riese Zombies map from Treyarch in Call of Duty: World at War within a Nazi research facility.

The map is now available on PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PlayStation 3. More information on other last-gen platform availability is said to follow.  

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Afterwords – The Elegant Challenge Of Jonathan Blow’s The Witness

The Witness is one of the early success stories of 2016, with critical acclaim (including our review) and encouraging sales numbers. Developer Jonathan Blow and his team at Thekla began the project in 2008, but the years of waiting have paid off for players in the form of an intriguing puzzle game unlike anything else. We chatted with Blow about creating the experience, the significance of certain puzzles, and his reaction to the whole pee-bottle thing.

This article originally ran in Game Informer issue 276.

In 2014, reports indicated that The Witness was nearing the finish line. Were there any big changes that pushed the release to 2016?
Nothing really changed. “Finish line” is relative, right? I didn’t think it would be as long as it has been; I was thinking, “Oh, maybe six or eight months, we’ll have this wrapped up.” But everyone has a different interpretation. Basically, that was a time when all of the major components of the gameplay were finalized…it just maybe needed to go faster, or certain objects needed to feel better. Because it’s such a big game, this finishing took a long time. If it comes down to working on it three more months or having something be kinda crappy, I’d rather work on it three more months. There was no dramatic setback or anything.

Are the puzzles able to enforce their own rules, or did you need to manually program all possible solutions?
All other things being equal, it is best if the program knows how to judge a puzzle, because it’s less error-prone. If I have to put in the solution, then I might make a mistake, especially when there are so many possible solutions that I might not see some of them. For most of the puzzle types, the program knows how to verify that a solution is correct, so I don’t actually need to foresee all correct solutions… But then there’s stuff in the game that the computer doesn’t really know about, and those solutions are all put in by hand – like when shadows are falling on an object in a certain way. That’s just not something the computer knows how to analyze.

So, if someone thinks they have a correct answer that isn’t being recognized properly, they’re wrong?
They’re probably wrong. In fact, every single one of those that anyone has sent me is wrong.

Do any of the puzzle themes stand out as being particularly difficult to design?
The thing that was hardest to design well is the cylinder puzzles. Because, you can wrap a puzzle around a cylinder, and that’s fine; you automatically have a human factor now, since you can’t see the whole puzzle. But if it ends up being a puzzle that you could solve just as well on a flat board, then why is it on the cylinder? It’s not interesting… So, all of the cylinder puzzles are made in such a way that either the connectivity of the space matters, or the fact that your line has to go all the way around matters.

Those cylinder puzzles defy sharing solutions through screenshots. Was that a reason for them being so near the end of the game?
It was more just about building up to interesting ideas. That whole end-game shaft area is about taking the ideas from earlier in the game and putting them together in a way that involves messing around with the presentation. The medium between you and the puzzle. Though, there is one of those cylinder puzzles very early in the game, also. Even though it’s right there, we sort of build the scene so that people tend to overlook it and go right past it.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Most of the design seems deliberate and purposeful, which makes certain things (like the discarded triangle panels) conspicuous. Does every panel in the game do something?
It depends on what you mean by “do something.” The triangle panels, for example, definitely do something, because otherwise there would be no way for you learn what the more complex triangle panels mean. Do they do something in terms of opening a door somewhere? No, they don’t… They do get checked off on the lake in middle of the island, so another thing they do is make you feel good about completing the lake. Usually things have another purpose or bearing on something else.

Many players need to use pencils and paper to help work through puzzles. Was that something you were consciously trying to bring to the experience?
I wouldn’t say that I was deliberately designing for pencil and paper as an agenda, but I would say that I was definitely designing counter to the trend of the last decade or more of just making games really easy and making puzzles not be real puzzles. Triple-A companies especially do all this playtesting, and anytime someone gets stuck on something or gives negative feedback, they change that thing. The thing about hard puzzles is people are going to get stuck on those, and they’re going to say, “I didn’t like this.” It’s just being willing to say, “No, this going to be in the game.” Maybe if they’re super-hard, they’re optional. You have to be willing to have that stuff in the game.

The audio recordings that address the story directly are hidden in an optional end-game area. Why not let players uncover them during a normal playthrough?
It all came down to how big I wanted the story to be in the ultimate experience. In early concepts of the game, I thought that story was going to be a very large part. But then as development went on and I refined the game, I kept revisiting the story and being very unhappy with the way my concept of the story would play out. Eventually I decided that the story should be pretty small, in terms of how much of the experience it makes up… I also don’t like giving story as a reward for ongoing play; I felt like I wanted to make a game that had confidence, that people really wanted to play the actual game part of the game, that doesn’t need to coax people through by giving them story bits.

How did you select the videos for the Windmill theater?
It was really about knowing what kinds of ideas that I wanted in the game, and the kind of presentation. All of those videos are, in one way or another, people talking about ideas about how to see the world. They are well-thought-out viewpoints from people whose life work is that. But the other thing about them is that they’re all different viewpoints. I’m not trying to put a bunch of things together to make a unified point or convince the player that these people are saying different flavors of the same thing. They’re saying different flavors of different things, and that ties into what the game is about at some level.

Some of the puzzles are inaccessible to some players – especially those who have trouble hearing or seeing colors. Was this a consideration during development?
We were very aware of that during development. I actually spent a lot of design time trying to design puzzles that only colorblind players could solve, but I didn’t succeed at that. But the way that I designed for accessibility is to just be aware that some people aren’t going to be able to do all of the puzzles, and then make it possible to complete the game without those puzzles. There are a few specific times where that happens. One very obvious example is the sound-based puzzles; you’re just not going get one of the lasers if you can’t hear… It’s a similar thing with the color-blindness; there’s basically one laser that requires color sense. But the surprising thing is that most color-blind people don’t seem to have a problem in that area… But it is still a problem for some people, because there are different kinds of color-blindness and magnitudes. There are only a couple areas of the game that are mandatory. To get the ending, you only need seven lasers… but there is a secret area that does require every laser. You know what? If people want to get there, and they have to look stuff up on the Internet to get there, that’s fine. I’m totally cool with that.

What did you think of the response to your tweet about the pee bottle?
It was bewildering! Here I was with a prop we used in filming – it was a bottle of water with some food coloring in it – and I was about to dump it out, and I was like, “I should get a picture of this before I dump it out.” I already had done one about a week before saying, “Here’s something I made in order to help finish The Witness,” and it was glasses with tape on them and holes in the tape… So, I was like, “I know what to do with this bottle, I’ll tweet another one of those.” But I expected people to know that it was a joke, and it would be mildly funny at best. For some reason, people didn’t know if it was a joke, and a lot of people assumed it wasn’t. I saw indie developers going off about quality of life in response to that. Like, full-on 10- or 15-tweet barrages about how this isn’t a healthy way to develop games. I’ve been a human male for 40-something years now; it doesn’t take very long to get up for a second and go to the bathroom. It just doesn’t. The idea that it would be plausible that someone would feel like they didn’t have time to do that is fundamentally not credible. I don’t know. It was very strange.

You’ve said that The Witness has been successful enough to fund another project of similar depth. How long until you start thinking about what’s next?
Well, I’ve started thinking about it already. However, there’s a difference between thinking about it and designing a thing for real. In terms of actually sitting down and starting to work on the game in a real way, that probably will not happen for a couple of months. There’s a lot to do right now, and I need a little bit of a vacation.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Afterwords – The Elegant Challenge Of Jonthan Blow’s The Witness

The Witness is one of the early success stories of 2016, with critical acclaim (including our review) and encouraging sales numbers. Developer Jonathan Blow and his team at Thekla began the project in 2008, but the years of waiting have paid off for players in the form of an intriguing puzzle game unlike anything else. We chatted with Blow about creating the experience, the significance of certain puzzles, and his reaction to the whole pee-bottle thing.

This article originally ran in Game Informer issue 276.

In 2014, reports indicated that The Witness was nearing the finish line. Were there any big changes that pushed the release to 2016?
Nothing really changed. “Finish line” is relative, right? I didn’t think it would be as long as it has been; I was thinking, “Oh, maybe six or eight months, we’ll have this wrapped up.” But everyone has a different interpretation. Basically, that was a time when all of the major components of the gameplay were finalized…it just maybe needed to go faster, or certain objects needed to feel better. Because it’s such a big game, this finishing took a long time. If it comes down to working on it three more months or having something be kinda crappy, I’d rather work on it three more months. There was no dramatic setback or anything.

Are the puzzles able to enforce their own rules, or did you need to manually program all possible solutions?
All other things being equal, it is best if the program knows how to judge a puzzle, because it’s less error-prone. If I have to put in the solution, then I might make a mistake, especially when there are so many possible solutions that I might not see some of them. For most of the puzzle types, the program knows how to verify that a solution is correct, so I don’t actually need to foresee all correct solutions… But then there’s stuff in the game that the computer doesn’t really know about, and those solutions are all put in by hand – like when shadows are falling on an object in a certain way. That’s just not something the computer knows how to analyze.

So, if someone thinks they have a correct answer that isn’t being recognized properly, they’re wrong?
They’re probably wrong. In fact, every single one of those that anyone has sent me is wrong.

Do any of the puzzle themes stand out as being particularly difficult to design?
The thing that was hardest to design well is the cylinder puzzles. Because, you can wrap a puzzle around a cylinder, and that’s fine; you automatically have a human factor now, since you can’t see the whole puzzle. But if it ends up being a puzzle that you could solve just as well on a flat board, then why is it on the cylinder? It’s not interesting… So, all of the cylinder puzzles are made in such a way that either the connectivity of the space matters, or the fact that your line has to go all the way around matters.

Those cylinder puzzles defy sharing solutions through screenshots. Was that a reason for them being so near the end of the game?
It was more just about building up to interesting ideas. That whole end-game shaft area is about taking the ideas from earlier in the game and putting them together in a way that involves messing around with the presentation. The medium between you and the puzzle. Though, there is one of those cylinder puzzles very early in the game, also. Even though it’s right there, we sort of build the scene so that people tend to overlook it and go right past it.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Most of the design seems deliberate and purposeful, which makes certain things (like the discarded triangle panels) conspicuous. Does every panel in the game do something?
It depends on what you mean by “do something.” The triangle panels, for example, definitely do something, because otherwise there would be no way for you learn what the more complex triangle panels mean. Do they do something in terms of opening a door somewhere? No, they don’t… They do get checked off on the lake in middle of the island, so another thing they do is make you feel good about completing the lake. Usually things have another purpose or bearing on something else.

Many players need to use pencils and paper to help work through puzzles. Was that something you were consciously trying to bring to the experience?
I wouldn’t say that I was deliberately designing for pencil and paper as an agenda, but I would say that I was definitely designing counter to the trend of the last decade or more of just making games really easy and making puzzles not be real puzzles. Triple-A companies especially do all this playtesting, and anytime someone gets stuck on something or gives negative feedback, they change that thing. The thing about hard puzzles is people are going to get stuck on those, and they’re going to say, “I didn’t like this.” It’s just being willing to say, “No, this going to be in the game.” Maybe if they’re super-hard, they’re optional. You have to be willing to have that stuff in the game.

The audio recordings that address the story directly are hidden in an optional end-game area. Why not let players uncover them during a normal playthrough?
It all came down to how big I wanted the story to be in the ultimate experience. In early concepts of the game, I thought that story was going to be a very large part. But then as development went on and I refined the game, I kept revisiting the story and being very unhappy with the way my concept of the story would play out. Eventually I decided that the story should be pretty small, in terms of how much of the experience it makes up… I also don’t like giving story as a reward for ongoing play; I felt like I wanted to make a game that had confidence, that people really wanted to play the actual game part of the game, that doesn’t need to coax people through by giving them story bits.

How did you select the videos for the Windmill theater?
It was really about knowing what kinds of ideas that I wanted in the game, and the kind of presentation. All of those videos are, in one way or another, people talking about ideas about how to see the world. They are well-thought-out viewpoints from people whose life work is that. But the other thing about them is that they’re all different viewpoints. I’m not trying to put a bunch of things together to make a unified point or convince the player that these people are saying different flavors of the same thing. They’re saying different flavors of different things, and that ties into what the game is about at some level.

Some of the puzzles are inaccessible to some players – especially those who have trouble hearing or seeing colors. Was this a consideration during development?
We were very aware of that during development. I actually spent a lot of design time trying to design puzzles that only colorblind players could solve, but I didn’t succeed at that. But the way that I designed for accessibility is to just be aware that some people aren’t going to be able to do all of the puzzles, and then make it possible to complete the game without those puzzles. There are a few specific times where that happens. One very obvious example is the sound-based puzzles; you’re just not going get one of the lasers if you can’t hear… It’s a similar thing with the color-blindness; there’s basically one laser that requires color sense. But the surprising thing is that most color-blind people don’t seem to have a problem in that area… But it is still a problem for some people, because there are different kinds of color-blindness and magnitudes. There are only a couple areas of the game that are mandatory. To get the ending, you only need seven lasers… but there is a secret area that does require every laser. You know what? If people want to get there, and they have to look stuff up on the Internet to get there, that’s fine. I’m totally cool with that.

What did you think of the response to your tweet about the pee bottle?
It was bewildering! Here I was with a prop we used in filming – it was a bottle of water with some food coloring in it – and I was about to dump it out, and I was like, “I should get a picture of this before I dump it out.” I already had done one about a week before saying, “Here’s something I made in order to help finish The Witness,” and it was glasses with tape on them and holes in the tape… So, I was like, “I know what to do with this bottle, I’ll tweet another one of those.” But I expected people to know that it was a joke, and it would be mildly funny at best. For some reason, people didn’t know if it was a joke, and a lot of people assumed it wasn’t. I saw indie developers going off about quality of life in response to that. Like, full-on 10- or 15-tweet barrages about how this isn’t a healthy way to develop games. I’ve been a human male for 40-something years now; it doesn’t take very long to get up for a second and go to the bathroom. It just doesn’t. The idea that it would be plausible that someone would feel like they didn’t have time to do that is fundamentally not credible. I don’t know. It was very strange.

You’ve said that The Witness has been successful enough to fund another project of similar depth. How long until you start thinking about what’s next?
Well, I’ve started thinking about it already. However, there’s a difference between thinking about it and designing a thing for real. In terms of actually sitting down and starting to work on the game in a real way, that probably will not happen for a couple of months. There’s a lot to do right now, and I need a little bit of a vacation.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Using familiar objects to enhance ‘the raw accessibility’ of games

“I’m more concerned with the raw accessibility of a game. And I want to make brand new games for the widest possible audience. … What they’re familiar with is the stuff that we have culturally: soccer balls, billiards, playing cards, dice.” …


Gamasutra News

Valve’s ‘The Lab’ a charming crash course for new VR players

Gamasutra had a chance to check out Valve Software’s HTC Vive demo collection, “The Lab,” which will be a good way for new Vive owners to show off their new toys. …


Gamasutra News

Kojima and del Toro fuel creativity with ‘the same passion’

What brought Mexican film director Guillermo del Toro and Japanese video game director Hideo Kojima together, as friends and collaborators? The two spoke about it, and their creative drive, together on stage today. …


Gamasutra News

Peter Stormare Returns As ‘The Replacer’ To Promote Call Of Duty DLC

Back when Black Ops II was the latest game in the Call of Duty rotation, Activision created a character called The Replacer to promote the game. Played by Peter Stormare (Armageddon, Fargo), the character stepped in to give average joes more time for fraggin’.

With the first Call of Duty: Black Ops III map pack, Awakening, nearly upon us, Stormare has re-enlisted. A new video promoting the four maps and new zombies chapter features the actor returning to the role of The Replacer.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

The humorous video also gives us a solid look at the four maps. And Stormare’s ankles. Meow.

The Awakening DLC will be out on February 2 for PlayStation 4. Xbox One and PC gamers will get in about 30 days later. The content is, as of now, not in the cards for PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360.

For more on the Awakening DLC, check out our previous coverage. You can also read our review of Black Ops III from the fall.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Games London initiative to make the city ‘the games capital of the world’

London’s video game industry is about to receive a £1.2 million boost following the launch of Games London, a new program designed to make the city “the games capital of the world.”  …


Gamasutra News

Rainbow Six Siege Review – The Under-Equipped Combatant

Ash is dead, but she doesn’t know it yet. 

Our team of operators is positioned at three different points of entry. I’m watching the assault unfold from inside the barricade with a drone I placed under a couch after locating the bomb. I see her outline approach the door cautiously, crouching to conceal the sound of her movement. But when a defender on the other side of the wall goes prone with his gun pointed at the wooden door, my warning to take cover comes too late. The stream of bullets rips the door to shreds, downing my comrade in the process. 

Now it’s four versus five. My teammate Fuze places his cluster charge on a nearby unfortified wall as I back out of my drone view to take position at a barricaded window. The grenades announce their presence with a satisfying thump-thump-thump, sending the defenders scrambling to avoid their explosions. I breach the window seconds afterward and train my sights on an enemy scrambling to heal a downed teammate. Four-three. From here, the skirmish devolves to a frantic display of environmental destruction, tactical peek-and-pop gunfire, and shouting as we communicate enemy positions. As the dust settles we emerge victorious, but now it’s our turn to survive an onslaught.

This satisfying blend of measured team tactics, frantic firefights, and high tech gadgetry has always been the centerpiece of the Rainbow Six experience, but Siege takes a different approach than its predecessors. Singularly focused on creating a balanced competitive playing field, many of the qualities we’ve come to expect from a Team Rainbow joint are AWOL in Siege. Cooperative campaign? Gone. Deep character customization? Abandoned. Terrorist hunt? Still standing, but hamstrung by weak A.I. and inflexibility. Siege sacrifices it all for the sake of one highly tuned multiplayer mode. 

And what a mode it is when everything falls into place. This five-on-five twist on Last Man Standing places the two teams in the roles of attackers and defenders. Before each of the best-of-five rounds starts (or best-of-seven for ranked matches), the attacking team takes control of drones to case the building and hopefully locate the objectives (which can be a hostage to save, a bomb to diffuse, or a weaponized chemical to secure). At the same time, the defenders scramble to fortify their position, laying down barbed wire, reinforcing walls susceptible to breaching, and setting traps. No matter what preparation the defenders make, however, a point of weakness is always present. 

The rounds are won when the attacking team completes its objective, the defenders prevent them from doing so in the allotted time, or if one of the two teams is wiped off the map. In my experience the objectives rarely decided matches; more than 90 percent of rounds were determined by the barrel of a player’s gun.

The depth and variety of these matches is driven by the cast of operators each team takes into a match, but don’t expect the grizzled cast of previous Rainbow Six entries. Siege abandons the Tom Clancy fiction in favor of a G.I. Joe-style ensemble of fighters. Each of the 20 options (10 for attack and 10 for defense) is named for the special ability he or she brings to the fray. For instance, defense-oriented operator Smoke unleashes poisonous gas, Kapkan puts booby traps on doors, and Pulse uses a heartbeat sensor to locate enemies through walls. On the attacker side, Thermite has an exothermic breach that can destroy reinforced walls, Blitz carries a shields useful for barging into dangerous rooms, and Sledge wields a sledgehammer that can break through destructible walls and doors. Each operative has a natural counter, and coordinating your team make-up is paramount to victory. 

After you learn the 10 maps, most of which are expertly designed for this type of match, a game of tactical chess reveals itself. Is the attacking team relying on the cluster bomb attack? Then set up an active defense system to intercept those grenades and protect your teammates. Is barbed wire blocking the most effective point of entry to the objective? Use Twitch’s drone to disable the traps. Contemplating these various strategies and executing them is the biggest thrill Siege offers.

In most shooters, once you die you simply sit on the sidelines until the next round starts. Siege smartly gives early casualties meaning by allowing defeated players to rotate between the security cameras or drones, calling out movement to their teammates still in the fray and even letting them mark enemy positions. Being able to continue as an active participant after death sooths the sting of sitting out the rest of the round, which typically last less than three minutes anyway. 

The tactical realities of these matches necessitate strong communication between your five teammates, which is both a strength and a weakness for Siege. When you have a group of five planning their strategies and calling out threats, the matches are exhilarating. But if you’re playing with teams dominated by players without headsets, the matches inevitably devolve into lone wolf crusades that almost always end with a loss. Ubisoft added visual cues so players without mics can mark threats and see where teammates are downed, but these are inadequate stand-ins for talking in a fever-pitched firefight. 

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Given the dependence on communication, Ubisoft curiously opted against implementing a clan infrastructure to enable players to find like-minded gamers craving a more structured experience. If you don’t jump into a match with a group of friends, you may need several rounds before you find enough players with mics to bring out the best in the game. Considering the lack of other content surrounding this mode, I’m surprised Siege doesn’t offer team names, uniform colors, logos, or eSports standards like spectator mode. Giving players a few more multiplayer modes to play would also go a long way toward rounding out the package.

The player customization also lacks the depth you would expect from Rainbow Six. As you play competitive matches, hunt terrorists, or complete objectives in the brief tutorial missions, you earn Renown. This currency is used to unlock new operatives and purchase weapon attachments or gaudy skins. Unlocking the majority of the 20 operative and the limited amount of scopes, barrels, and handles for the various weapons doesn’t take too long; like Titanfall, Evolve, and Star Wars Battlefront before it, Siege is missing the long-term progression tail to keep players invested. This is especially disappointing given the abundance of player customization found in previous Rainbow Six titles, which let you tweak everything from armor placement to clothing. I appreciate limiting weapon customization for the sake of balance, but nothing is preventing Ubisoft from opening the floodgates with personalization accessories.

The questionable hit detection may drive some players away as well. I commonly saw something very different watching killcams than I experienced during my death. While it seemed like I got a handful of rounds off before being dropped, the replay claims I only fired one. These discrepancies can be maddening, and Ubisoft needs to address this quickly given its eSports aspirations. The rappel system is also awkward; don’t be surprised to plummet to your death when you think you’ve attached the rope but haven’t.

I also noticed occasional infrastructure hiccups in the various modes. Backing out of terrorist mode disbands the party you brought together, server recalibrations between matches can be slow, and replacement players are not always added at the beginning of a match when a player from the last round drops out. Playing three-versus-five is maddening, especially in the ranked play rounds that punish players with a temporary ban should they leave a match before completion. 

Fans of the well-crafted, single-player campaigns of previous Rainbow Six games will find nothing of value in Siege. The short tutorial missions lack replay value, and the popular Terrorist Hunt mode, which can be played with up to five friends, gives players little options other than ramping up the difficulty. Locking players out of selecting the map they want to play on is a curious decision, as are many of the battle tactics you see the enemy A.I. employ.  

The multiplayer core at the heart of Rainbow Six Siege is a great foundation. But given its lack of infrastructure around the mode and severe lack of meaningful modes to buttress it, Siege feels slight when compared to its past entries and the other big-name first-person shooter franchises it competes against. The tactical demands Siege puts on players is unlike anything else on the console market today, and may prove enough for those seeking this flavor of first-person shooter. However, Siege doesn’t do enough to unite players who understand the importance of communication or provide variation in rest of the package. 

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed