Master of The Free World Productions | Jumpcut Entertainment Network

New Alien: Isolation Pinball Table Trailer Shows A Bug-B-Que

It's doubtful that anyone thought "Pinball!" while playing the 2014 survival-horror game Alien: Isolation, but the creative minds at Zen Studios saw potential in The Creative Assembly's game. Alien vs. Pinball brings a trio of new tables to Zen's pinball platform, including the one featured in today's all-new trailer.

The table follows the same general story arc as the original game, pitting Amanda Ripley against a cunning alien in the abandoned Sevastopol Station. As the trailer below shows, you'll have to worm your way through various tunnels and hatches to avoid detection – only you're doing it with flippers and a ball. Take a look at the pack's announce post for footage of the other pair of tables in action.

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The Aliens vs. Pinball pack is set for an April 26 release as part of Alien Day. The tables are coming to PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PC, Mac, and iOS.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

New Warcraft Trailer Shows A Sea Of Orcs And New Footage

Legendary has released a new trailer for the upcoming film adaptation of Blizzard's phenomenal Warcraft series. The new trailer shows humans clashing with orcs, villages torn asunder, and lots of computer generated special effects.

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Warcraft is directed by Duncan Jones (Moon, Source Code), and tells the story of Azeroth on the brink of war. Orcs are encroaching on human territory as their world is being destroyed, and tension between the two factions comes to a head in this trailer. The movie opens in theaters on June 10.

It's been a busy time for everything Warcraft with promotion for the film ramping up, Blizzard issuing a cease and desist to a vanilla World of Warcraft server, and the latest WoW expansion arriving in August. To see previous coverage on the Warcraft movie, click here

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The Rocky History Of Live-Action Shows Based On Games

This feature was originally published April 13, 2016.

The intersection of live-action shows and video games is a strange thing. There have been plenty of animated shows based on games, but the live-action adaptations have often been odd, awkward attempts at bridging games and the real world. However, they’ve also changed dramatically with time – from the cringeworthy live-action/animation hybrids like The Super Mario Bros. Super Show and Captain N all the way up to more modern takes like Defiance and Bright Falls. Dozens of live-action films based on games have been released throughout the years, but serialized TV programs are comparatively rare. With the recent launch of Quantum Break and its own unique use of live-action in a game, we’ve decided to share a brief history of live-action shows based on games to see how the concept has transformed up to today.

Video games were getting popular in the late '80s and '90s, and that made them a prime target for a number of Hollywood cash grabs. Most of these were one-off movies that were loosely based on their games, like Street Fighter and Double Dragon in 1994. Live-action shows based on games were few and far between, but the best (or worst) example of television’s shaky grasp on video games may be Mortal Kombat: Conquest. No, that’s not a typo – it was really called “Conquest” and not “Konquest." Aside from that glaring problem, the show was about the exploits of a young Kung Lao and a host of other Mortal Kombat stand-ins, which served as a weird subplot to the games. Most of the scenes involve two characters in ridiculous costumes saying a few sentences to each other before an embarrassing, prolonged fight to canned rock music. The show was panned for its poor acting, dumb dialogue, wire-fu choreography and lack of violence, lasting only one season between 1998 and 1999 before promptly being cancelled.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

It wasn’t all bad in the '90s, though. One live-action show based on a game actually ended up being a rousing success: the Carmen Sandiego show. Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? was a quiz show inspired by the educational adventure game of the same name. Each episode, three kids would be contestants and answer various geography questions to locate a thief and win prize money. It included many of the game’s token characters and criminals, along with the titular villain Carmen Sandiego as the focal point of every episode. Besides being an educational program that wasn’t painfully boring, the show was recognized for its outstanding performances, set direction, graphic design and production values, winning six Daytime Emmy Awards overall. Oh, and it had an amazingly catchy theme song, too. It spawned five seasons that stretched for 295 episodes, and was followed up by a history-focused series titled Where in Time Is Carmen Sandiego? in 1996.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Despite the rare accomplishment of shows like Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?, live-action shows based on games were nowhere near successful enough to last into the new millennium. Plenty of lackluster video game movies were still being made, but producers weren’t willing to back the long term investment of a live-action TV series based on video games.  A lot of things had to happen before we saw people acting out video game characters on the small screen again: a decade passed, the internet became widespread, and games merged with popular culture like never before. While the live-action shows of the '90s were only roughly based on video games, a real crossover between television and video games finally came along in 2013.

Defiance was a true marriage of TV and games; it essentially started out doing what Quantum Break is doing now. The show was released in conjunction with the game, supplementing its universe and introducing many characters that were important to its events. The fragile coexistence of human and alien species on a morphed, battle-scarred Earth was generally seen as interesting by critics, who also liked the impressive special effects as well as its great casting and performances. However, the show itself was considered to be pretty derivative of other sci-fi works and received mostly middling reviews. Still, the project illustrated how the two mediums could progress side-by-side.

Publishers and fans alike also started creating new, higher-profile additions to different game universes – this triggered a rise in the number of miniseries. Some of the most notable examples are Dragon Age: Redemption and Fallout: Nuka Break in 2011, both of which were well-received webseries made by fans that even earned the recognition of the games’ developers. They were seen as innovative live shows that were authentic to their respective games, which was an exceptional compliment at the time. Publishers like Microsoft also jumped on board and weaved live-action miniseries into the launches of their games, with big names and high production values attached to them. These included Halo 4: Forward Unto Dawn and Halo: Nightfall before the release of Halo 5, involving people like Ridley Scott and starring talent from the Narnia films and Jessica Jones. The trend of live-action miniseries has continued up to today with shows like the ongoing Street Fighter: Resurrection, boosting the quality and popularity of live-action shows based on games even further.

Most recently, the interconnection between live-action shows and games is unfolding through Remedy’s Quantum Break. Remedy is no stranger to combining TV and games – the Alan Wake prequel series Bright Falls was their first foray into a real live-action program, and it was a surprisingly good one. They’ve referenced and incorporated parts of TV history into their games as well, especially with the heavy influence of Twin Peaks and The Twilight Zone in the Alan Wake series. Quantum Break’s player-driven gameplay and choice-based episodes show how far the idea of live-action within games has come from its earliest days. You can get the details on Quantum Break and its narrative approach in our hub, where we talked with the game’s creators about everything from the future of interactive storytelling to Aidan Gillen’s little fingers.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

The Rocky History Of Live-Action Shows Based On Games

The intersection of live-action shows and video games is a strange thing. There have been plenty of animated shows based on games, but the live-action adaptations have often been odd, awkward attempts at bridging games and the real world. However, they’ve also changed dramatically with time – from the cringeworthy live-action/animation hybrids like The Super Mario Bros. Super Show and Captain N all the way up to more modern takes like Defiance and Bright Falls. Dozens of live-action films based on games have been released throughout the years, but serialized TV programs are comparatively rare. With the recent launch of Quantum Break and its own unique use of live-action in a game, we’ve decided to share a brief history of live-action shows based on games to see how the concept has transformed up to today.

Video games were getting popular in the late '80s and '90s, and that made them a prime target for a number of Hollywood cash grabs. Most of these were one-off movies that were loosely based on their games, like Street Fighter and Double Dragon in 1994. Live-action shows based on games were few and far between, but the best (or worst) example of television’s shaky grasp on video games may be Mortal Kombat: Conquest. No, that’s not a typo – it was really called “Conquest” and not “Konquest." Aside from that glaring problem, the show was about the exploits of a young Kung Lao and a host of other Mortal Kombat stand-ins, which served as a weird subplot to the games. Most of the scenes involve two characters in ridiculous costumes saying a few sentences to each other before an embarrassing, prolonged fight to canned rock music. The show was panned for its poor acting, dumb dialogue, wire-fu choreography and lack of violence, lasting only one season between 1998 and 1999 before promptly being cancelled.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

It wasn’t all bad in the '90s, though. One live-action show based on a game actually ended up being a rousing success: the Carmen Sandiego show. Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? was a quiz show inspired by the educational adventure game of the same name. Each episode, three kids would be contestants and answer various geography questions to locate a thief and win prize money. It included many of the game’s token characters and criminals, along with the titular villain Carmen Sandiego as the focal point of every episode. Besides being an educational program that wasn’t painfully boring, the show was recognized for its outstanding performances, set direction, graphic design and production values, winning six Daytime Emmy Awards overall. Oh, and it had an amazingly catchy theme song, too. It spawned five seasons that stretched for 295 episodes, and was followed up by a history-focused series titled Where in Time Is Carmen Sandiego? in 1996.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Despite the rare accomplishment of shows like Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?, live-action shows based on games were nowhere near successful enough to last into the new millennium. Plenty of lackluster video game movies were still being made, but producers weren’t willing to back the long term investment of a live-action TV series based on video games.  A lot of things had to happen before we saw people acting out video game characters on the small screen again: a decade passed, the internet became widespread, and games merged with popular culture like never before. While the live-action shows of the '90s were only roughly based on video games, a real crossover between television and video games finally came along in 2013.

Defiance was a true marriage of TV and games; it essentially started out doing what Quantum Break is doing now. The show was released in conjunction with the game, supplementing its universe and introducing many characters that were important to its events. The fragile coexistence of human and alien species on a morphed, battle-scarred Earth was generally seen as interesting by critics, who also liked the impressive special effects as well as its great casting and performances. However, the show itself was considered to be pretty derivative of other sci-fi works and received mostly middling reviews. Still, the project illustrated how the two mediums could progress side-by-side.

Publishers and fans alike also started creating new, higher-profile additions to different game universes – this triggered a rise in the number of miniseries. Some of the most notable examples are Dragon Age: Redemption and Fallout: Nuka Break in 2011, both of which were well-received webseries made by fans that even earned the recognition of the games’ developers. They were seen as innovative live shows that were authentic to their respective games, which was an exceptional compliment at the time. Publishers like Microsoft also jumped on board and weaved live-action miniseries into the launches of their games, with big names and high production values attached to them. These included Halo 4: Forward Unto Dawn and Halo: Nightfall before the release of Halo 5, involving people like Ridley Scott and starring talent from the Narnia films and Jessica Jones. The trend of live-action miniseries has continued up to today with shows like the ongoing Street Fighter: Resurrection, boosting the quality and popularity of live-action shows based on games even further.

Most recently, the interconnection between live-action shows and games is unfolding through Remedy’s Quantum Break. Remedy is no stranger to combining TV and games – the Alan Wake prequel series Bright Falls was their first foray into a real live-action program, and it was a surprisingly good one. They’ve referenced and incorporated parts of TV history into their games as well, especially with the heavy influence of Twin Peaks and The Twilight Zone in the Alan Wake series. Quantum Break’s player-driven gameplay and choice-based episodes show how far the idea of live-action within games has come from its earliest days. You can get the details on Quantum Break and its narrative approach in our hub, where we talked with the game’s creators about everything from the future of interactive storytelling to Aidan Gillen’s little fingers.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

The Rocky History Of Live-Action Shows Based On Games

The intersection of live-action shows and video games is a strange thing. There have been plenty of animated shows based on games, but the live-action adaptations have often been odd, awkward attempts at bridging games and the real world. However, they’ve also changed dramatically with time – from the cringeworthy live-action/animation hybrids like The Super Mario Bros. Super Show and Captain N all the way up to more modern takes like Defiance and Bright Falls. Dozens of live-action films based on games have been released throughout the years, but serialized TV programs are comparatively rare. With the recent launch of Quantum Break and its own unique use of live-action in a game, we’ve decided to share a brief history of live-action shows based on games to see how the concept has transformed up to today.

Video games were getting popular in the late '80s and '90s, and that made them a prime target for a number of Hollywood cash grabs. Most of these were one-off movies that were loosely based on their games, like Street Fighter and Double Dragon in 1994. Live-action shows based on games were few and far between, but the best (or worst) example of television’s shaky grasp on video games may be Mortal Kombat: Conquest. No, that’s not a typo – it was really called “Conquest” and not “Konquest." Aside from that glaring problem, the show was about the exploits of a young Kung Lao and a host of other Mortal Kombat stand-ins, which served as a weird subplot to the games. Most of the scenes involve two characters in ridiculous costumes saying a few sentences to each other before an embarrassing, prolonged fight to canned rock music. The show was panned for its poor acting, dumb dialogue, wire-fu choreography and lack of violence, lasting only one season between 1998 and 1999 before promptly being cancelled.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

It wasn’t all bad in the '90s, though. One live-action show based on a game actually ended up being a rousing success: the Carmen Sandiego show. Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? was a quiz show inspired by the educational adventure game of the same name. Each episode, three kids would be contestants and answer various geography questions to locate a thief and win prize money. It included many of the game’s token characters and criminals, along with the titular villain Carmen Sandiego as the focal point of every episode. Besides being an educational program that wasn’t painfully boring, the show was recognized for its outstanding performances, set direction, graphic design and production values, winning six Daytime Emmy Awards overall. Oh, and it had an amazingly catchy theme song, too. It spawned five seasons that stretched for 295 episodes, and was followed up by a history-focused series titled Where in Time Is Carmen Sandiego? in 1996.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Despite the rare accomplishment of shows like Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego?, live-action shows based on games were nowhere near successful enough to last into the new millennium. Plenty of lackluster video game movies were still being made, but producers weren’t willing to back the long term investment of a live-action TV series based on video games.  A lot of things had to happen before we saw people acting out video game characters on the small screen again: a decade passed, the internet became widespread, and games merged with popular culture like never before. While the live-action shows of the '90s were only roughly based on video games, a real crossover between television and video games finally came along in 2013.

Defiance was a true marriage of TV and games; it essentially started out doing what Quantum Break is doing now. The show was released in conjunction with the game, supplementing its universe and introducing many characters that were important to its events. The fragile coexistence of human and alien species on a morphed, battle-scarred Earth was generally seen as interesting by critics, who also liked the impressive special effects as well as its great casting and performances. However, the show itself was considered to be pretty derivative of other sci-fi works and received mostly middling reviews. Still, the project illustrated how the two mediums could progress side-by-side.

Publishers and fans alike also started creating new, higher-profile additions to different game universes – this triggered a rise in the number of miniseries. Some of the most notable examples are Dragon Age: Redemption and Fallout: Nuka Break in 2011, both of which were well-received webseries made by fans that even earned the recognition of the games’ developers. They were seen as innovative live shows that were authentic to their respective games, which was an exceptional compliment at the time. Publishers like Microsoft also jumped on board and weaved live-action miniseries into the launches of their games, with big names and high production values attached to them. These included Halo 4: Forward Unto Dawn and Halo: Nightfall before the release of Halo 5, involving people like Ridley Scott and starring talent from the Narnia films and Jessica Jones. The trend of live-action miniseries has continued up to today with shows like the ongoing Street Fighter: Resurrection, boosting the quality and popularity of live-action shows based on games even further.

Most recently, the interconnection between live-action shows and games is unfolding through Remedy’s Quantum Break. Remedy is no stranger to combining TV and games – the Alan Wake prequel series Bright Falls was their first foray into a real live-action program, and it was a surprisingly good one. They’ve referenced and incorporated parts of TV history into their games as well, especially with the heavy influence of Twin Peaks and The Twilight Zone in the Alan Wake series. Quantum Break’s player-driven gameplay and choice-based episodes show how far the idea of live-action within games has come from its earliest days. You can get the details on Quantum Break and its narrative approach in our hub, where we talked with the game’s creators about everything from the future of interactive storytelling to Aidan Gillen’s little fingers.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

First Doctor Strange Teaser Shows A Broken Man Begin His Path To Greatness

The Marvel Cinematic Universe’s take on magic has, thus far, been advanced science parading as the mystical. Asgardians and the Infinity Gems might be beyond the understanding of mere mortals, but they are simply the products of advanced technology.

That all changes this fall. Marvel has dropped the first trailer for Doctor Strange starring Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock). After a horrific car accident, surgeon Stephen Strange’s hands were broken and useless.

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He begins a journey of self-discovery in which he finds there is more to the world than medicine and science. He eventually become’s Earth’s Sorcerer Supreme, and the first trailer shows his first steps on that path.

Doctor Strange will be in theaters on November 4.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Final Fantasy XV’s Latest Trailer Shows A New Summon In Action

Among the other announcements at tonight's Final Fantasy Uncovered event, Square Enix unleashed a new trailer showing off more of the game in action.

Most of the trailer would be enough to get any Final Fantasy fan excited, but even if you have no particular allegiance to the series, you should pay attention the summon sequence. It shows the enormous Titan emerging onto the scene, and like Ramuh from the Episode Duscae demo, seems to indicate that summons will be a majorly impressive element of the game.

Of course, you also see more of the story and combat, too. Watch it for yourself below:

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For more Final Fantasy XV, you can read our chronicle of its 10-year development. I also recommend the previous trailer, entitled Dawn 2.0.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Killer Instinct Season 3 Launch Trailer Shows Everything Coming Tomorrow And Teases The Future

Killer Instinct's third season begins tomorrow bringing new characters, upgraded visuals, many other additions. You can find them all in this trailer.

The trailer also offers some minor teases about what to expect in the future, like a new character in June, and a new character and multiplayer mode in July. To see the new characters, new visuals, and new customizations, check out the trailer below.

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For details on the game's somewhat complicated pricing structure and exactly when the content will be available, head here. You can also head here to learn how to play as the Arbiter.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

New Star Citizen Trailer Shows Off The Massive Starfarer Ship

A new trailer from Cloud Imperium Games shows off the MISC Starfarer, a massive cargo ship that is now hangar ready in the alpha's newest 2.3 patch.

The MISC Starfarer is a ship designed for fuel transport, while also refining spaceborne hydrogen without needing to land. The interior and exterior of the ship are given a nice tour in the video below. 

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Star Citizen has broken records with its multi-million dollar crowdfunding campaign, however the game has had some drama. To view another trailer that shows off planetary scale, go here. Star Citizen is currently in alpha and is available for PC.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens Gameplay Shows Off Cover System And Ship Battles

You read that headline correctly. For the first time in a Lego game, you’ll be able to take cover during blaster battles.

This appears to fundamentally alter the more haphazard combat found in previous Lego titles, as you can see in the video below. And that’s not the only change.

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Multi-builds allow you to turn a pile of bricks into different creations, adding a new dimension to puzzle solving. You’ll also be able to take part in more free-form dogfights in X-Wings, TIE Fighters, and the Millennium Falcon.

Lego Star Wars: The Force Awakens will be out on June 28 for PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Wii U, PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii U, Vita, 3DS, PC. For more, check out our coverage from March 2016.

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