Master of The Free World Productions | Jumpcut Entertainment Network

Designer Interview: Getting Titanfall’s controls just right

Various members of the team at Respawn Entertainment team describe how the studio sculpted the fluid, precise, surprisingly intuitive controls of the Titanfall series. …


Gamasutra News

Stories Untold Review – Minimalist Horror Done Right

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Stories Untold appears to be a quiet and inconspicuous game at first. This digital anthology of horror stories is essentially a series of escape-the-room puzzles that take place in different universes, but the tales have gripping and emotional threads to connect them. The unique structure is an effective vehicle to deliver something more nuanced than bump-in-the-night thrills; you confront scenes of death, guilt, and heartbreak. However, even on a moment-by-moment level, both the scares and gameplay are satisfying.

Stories Untold is divided into four sections, and each has its own familiar theme and focus. The first level has you sitting at a desk in a suburban home on a dark night, playing a text adventure on a retro PC while the environment changes to whatever actions happen in the text adventure. Examining photos in the text adventure might lead to the family photos on your desk becoming disfigured. Answering the phone in the adventure might result in the phone in front of your desk ringing. This sort of thing might sound kind of hokey, but it successfully nails the haunted-house atmosphere it’s going for. The music is just right, the text adventure’s writing is tight, and everything leads to compelling places in both the individual story and the larger picture.

Later levels have you doing more sophisticated, challenging puzzles. The second one has you following a manual to use a series of machines, including a power drill and an X-ray, to help scientists understand a mysterious object locked away in a vault. The sheer number of things you can interact with in this level is initially overwhelming, especially when you take a look at the manual. However, Stories Untold succeeds because it does a solid job of giving you enough audio cues and textual hints to lead you down the right path without holding your hand.

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Many of the solutions are obscure and require a keen eye and patience. The third story is particularly frustrating, requiring you to decode messages with Morse code and instructions hidden in microfilm. Some puzzles are more annoying than others, with vital info or mechanics being hidden away in the background of each level. That being said, every puzzle I solved left me feeling satisfied and a little proud, even if its logic was convoluted.

The atmosphere of each level is also impressive, venturing into surprising territory with varied, genre-shifting gameplay; the first game’s haunted-house tricks, for example, don’t become the crux of the whole anthology. In one puzzle, you are sitting at a desk, examining minute details for the solution to your current obstacle. In the next, you are navigating a creepy, snowy labyrinth in first-person. Even when I was confronted by a puzzle that seemed impossible to solve, I kept on going because I wanted to see what else Stories Untold would throw at me next, and the answer was that it had something new and interesting in its pocket every step of the way, especially when it comes to the finale. The themes and plot points that run across the anthology are united in the final segment in a way that feels satisfying and surprising. It’s a dark, twisted ending that packs some serious emotional power; I don’t want to spoil anything, but I can say that the payoff is more than worth the effort.

Stories Untold is a unique four-hour experience that both horror fans and those who love to dissect head-scratching enigmas should check out. Though a number of frustrating puzzles may prove too tiresome for many, those who stick with it will find themselves rewarded with a treasure trove of gruesome and morbid delights.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Don’t Miss: How to train players right, so they don’t hate learning to play

Designer Mike Stout takes a look at examples of in-game training that skip the boring tutorials and teach players the rules of the game by letting them play the game. …


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Don’t Miss: The psychology of doing VR game design right

At GDC 2016, game developer and cognitive scientist Kimberly Voll explored what developers need to know about the inner-workings of the human mind in order to create immersive VR games. …


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Watch Extended Demos Of Nintendo Switch’s Launch Games Right Now

This morning's Nintendo Treehouse stream is devoted to the
Switch, and they're going in-depth with some of the system's launch games.

Nintendo finally spilled the beans on its upcoming console
during last
night's presentation
, but most of the revealed games got a cursory look at
best. Today the company is providing hands-on time at its reveal event in New
York City (stay tuned for hands-on impressions!), but if you're not on the east
coast, the Nintendo Treehouse livestream is the next best thing. Nintendo has
lined up a host of full-fledged demos that will give you a better look at the
games as well as the hardware. You can check it out below!

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As mentioned earlier, G.I. editors Kyle Hilliard and Ben
Reeves are at the event, so you can expect hands-on impressions of all the
newly revealed games later in the day.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

The PC Version Of Mass Effect 2 Is Free Right Now

The second entry in Bioware's grand sci-fi trilogy is free right now. Well, the PC version is anyway.

EA is offering Mass Effect 2 as part of its On The House program, which means it's temporarily free for Origin users. So if you haven't played Mass Effect 2 yet, and want to, now's your chance to do it for free.

You can grab the game here and our coverage of the upcoming Mass Effect Andromeda, set to be released on March 21.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Military consultant speaks to what games get right — and wrong — about killer robots

“You’ll be like: ‘That’s not realistic,’ and people will say: ‘But that’s how robots are supposed to look,’” military futurist P.W. Singer tells Waypoint. “Science fiction shapes the way we think.” …


Gamasutra News

Reader Discussion – Is No Man’s Sky’s ‘Foundation’ Update A Step In The Right Direction?

When No Man's Sky released this past summer, it's without a doubt that it failed to meet many fans' expectations. Today, a significantly large update went live, addressing many of the problems from the base game, and adding features such as farming, freighters, and building your own bases. Is it enough? Are these additions coming too late, or do you think there's room for No Man's Sky to see improvement?

Are you someone who didn't enjoy No Man's Sky when it released? Is this and the promise of future updates enough to bring you back to the game? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Reader Discussion – Is No Man’s Sky’s ‘Foundation’ Update A Step In The Right Direction?

When No Man's Sky released this past summer, it's without a doubt that it failed to meet many fans' expectations. Today, a significantly large update went live, addressing many of the problems from the base game, and adding features such as farming, freighters, and building your own bases. Is it enough? Are these additions coming too late, or do you think there's room for No Man's Sky to see improvement?

Are you someone who didn't enjoy No Man's Sky when it released? Is this and the promise of future updates enough to bring you back to the game? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Reader Discussion – Is No Man’s Sky’s ‘Foundation’ Update A Step In The Right Direction?

When No Man's Sky released this past summer, it's without a doubt that it failed to meet many fans' expectations. Today, a significantly large update went live, addressing many of the problems from the base game, and adding features such as farming, freighters, and building your own bases. Is it enough? Are these additions coming too late, or do you think there's room for No Man's Sky to see improvement?

Are you someone who didn't enjoy No Man's Sky when it released? Is this and the promise of future updates enough to bring you back to the game? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed