Master of The Free World Productions | Jumpcut Entertainment Network

Free-To-Play MMO Trove Launches Today On PlayStation 4, Xbox One

It's been a while since our PC preview of Trion Worlds' Trove. Following an open beta for console, the free-to-play MMO launched today for PS4 and Xbox One, letting console gamers join the fight against the Shadow's evil forces.

Trove's open world features 14 playable classes, crafting and customization systems, and the ability to construct or deconstruct worlds. In the game's new console launch trailer below, players are introduced to the main antagonist, the Shadow, and given a glimpse of the cube art aesthetic.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

A free download of the game is available on both the PlayStation and Xbox stores. Links to the downloads can also be found on Trove's website here.

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PlayStation Now’s game streaming library will soon include PS4 games

After removing the PlayStation Now support from the PlayStation 3, Vita, and other devices last month, Sony has announced plans to add current-generation titles to its cloud-based game streaming service. …


Gamasutra News

PlayStation is partnering with Girls Make Games to host a game dev summer camp

The three-week long event will teach young girls, aged 11 to 14, to design, program, and publish their own games under the tutelage of local game developers and female PlayStation devs and executives. …


Gamasutra News

PlayStation 4 Update 4.5 Coming Out Tomorrow

Tomorrow brings the 4.5 update to PlayStation 4 and PS Pro, and with it comes improvements for the PSVR experience, boost mode for PS4 Pro, and more.

Boost mode (toggled on in the system settings) improves older titles that have not received a PS4 Pro patch. While not applicable to all legacy titles, Boost mode should provide framerate stability and possibly faster load times.

Also included in the update is external hard drive support, improved screen resolution when coming out of VR mode, custom wallpapers, voice chat for remote play, updates for some apps, and more.

For a full rundown of the 4.5 update, please click the source links below.

[Source: Official PlayStation Blog (1), (2)]

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PlayStation VR Selling Above Sony Expectations, Nearing 1 Million Units

Although VR as a field isn't lighting the world on fire the way everyone expected, that doesn't mean it's been a colossal failure for everyone involved. Take Sony, which seems pleasantly surprised by the success of its peripheral.

Speaking with the New York Times, global chief executive of Sony Interactive Entertainment Andrew House revealed the company has sold over 915,000 PSVR units as of February 19. That number is a far lower than some initial sales forecasts of 2.6 million (which were then lowered to 750,000), but still above Sony's, which hopes to sell 1 million units by mid-April, which now seems inevitable.

This makes the PSVR the highest-selling headset of the three main contenders (it, the HTC Vive, and the Oculus Rift), though it still falls behind the Gear VR, according to sales estimates. Still, reaching the million-sold milestone could bode well for the PSVR's future. "“We were expecting it to be a lot smaller than it has turned out to be,” House said.

 

Our Take
With an easy upgrade path in the PlayStation 4, games like Resident Evil 7 support VR, and games like Farpoint on the way, this could be the start of on upswing in virtual reality.

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Should You Give PlayStation Now Another Shot?

PlayStation Now is a premium service that first released in 2015, allowing subscribers to stream over 100 PS3 games to a variety of devices. The product of Sony’s $ 380 million acquisition of cloud streaming company Gaikai, expectations were high that the service would help to bring cloud-based gaming into the mainstream. However, a number of factors, such as an unexpectedly high price point, minimal selection of games, and frequent internet connection issues, kept the service from truly breaking out. While the service still has stalwart defenders, it’s fair to say that interest has waned.

While the service may have been written off by many, a lot can happen in just a couple of years. We took a look at Now’s most common complaints at launch and whether or not the grievances have been addressed and improved. More than two years later, is PlayStation Now worth another shot?


Complaint: Small Game Selection

Then: There was a lot of talk of PlayStation Now being dead on arrival, but Sony never gave up on supporting their investment into the cloud gaming platform. It launched with only about 100 games, but titles were continually added to the service. For a while, they only brought in a handful of titles per month, but that number has actually grown over time, with some months adding a dozen or more titles. Still, nothing can match November 2015, when Sony added an unprecedented 105 games, including titans such as Street Fighter, Resident Evil, Earth Defense Force, and a slew of SNK classics including King of Fighters and Fatal Fury.

Now: The number of games on PlayStation Now has grown from 100 to well over 460, and Sony is showing no signs of reining in their continued support for the service. There are some big-shot PlayStation exclusives like Heavy Rain, inFamous, the first three Uncharted games, and the entire God of War catalog, in addition to multiplatform heavies like BioShock, Tomb Raider, Dead Island, and Saints Row. Beyond that, there are also a slew of cult favorites (Dead to Rights: Retribution, Red Faction: Guerilla), arcade classics (Q*bert Rebooted, Namco Museum Essentials, Frogger Returns), and even a bunch of stinkers, which are good for little more than a cheap laugh (Heavy Fire: Afghanistan, Alien Rage).

Verdict: PlayStation Now’s greatest asset in 2017 is the sheer quantity of quality titles available for the service. From blockbuster action titles to JRPGs, there is plenty here for every type of gamer.


Complaint: High Price

Then: At launch, the cost of a PlayStation Now subscription was pretty steep: $ 20 a month, or $ 45 for three months. All told, that’s between $ 180 and $ 240 for a year of the service. For that kind of money, you could buy four years of PlayStation Plus or Xbox Live Gold, or raid your local used-game store for dozens of the older titles that are available on PS Now.

Now: In the years since that disappointing price point was announced, the cost of PlayStation Now hasn’t changed. However, they did put the service on sale, temporarily offering a 12-month subscription for $ 100, or less than nine bucks per month. It’s a mystery why this deal isn’t always in place, since $ 100 is competitive with streaming giants like Amazon and Netflix, of which PlayStation Now is striving to be the video game equivalent. That sale has come and gone twice over the past two years, so while it’s safe to assume it may return to that price at some point, new users are unable to take advantage of it at the moment.

Verdict: If the $ 100 annual subscription were to be made a permanent fixture, PlayStation Now would be a much more attractive option for gamers on a budget or who just don’t feel like putting down ~$ 200 in addition to their PS Plus subscription, game purchases, and myriad other expenses.


Complaint: Vita Troubles

Then: At launch, one of the most appealing aspects of PlayStation Now was that you could log in and play on either PS3, PS4, PlayStation Vita, or even certain Sony-branded televisions, as long as the local WiFi could take the heat.

The weak link in this chain, however, was always the PlayStation Vita. In theory, it’s the perfect device for the service; the Vita already supports Remote Play, in which PS4 games can be streamed from a console directly to the handheld, but users have had mixed experiences. Some of us regularly enjoy playing PS4 games on Sony’s handheld, while others simply cannot get a stable enough connection, leading to endless stuttering, lag, and crippled resolution – if they can get it working at all. To those without connection issues, PS4/Vita Remote Play works because developers can optimize their game’s controls to the Vita’s lack of extra shoulder buttons or clickable thumbsticks. For example, when playing Destiny on Vita, the sprint function is moved, by default, from L3 to down on the directional pad, making for a more natural gameplay experience on the handheld than if the function were mapped to the dreaded rear touch pad. On PlayStation Now, however, controller settings were not optimized for the Vita’s reduced button count, and all R2/L2 and R3/L3 functions are relegated to the touch pad without any option for customization.

Now: The Vita never did get around to allowing users to remap touch-pad functionality to button inputs, rendering titles like Saints Row 2 and Bodycount unplayable on PlayStation Now on Vita, save for the few players who invested in a third-party peripheral that added extra triggers to the system. Of course, that’s all moot now, with the surprise announcement that Now support for Vita (and PS3, Bravia televisions, Blu-ray players) is being dropped completely on August 15. Moving forward, Now will only be supported on PlayStation 4 and PC.

Last year, Sony added Now support to PCs, including laptops. Laptops are slightly less portable than the Vita, and the increasing marginalization of Sony’s underrated handheld is lamentable, but maybe this is the best solution; simply bring a laptop, a DualShock 4, and a Micro USB connector, and the entire PlayStation Now library is readily accessible in a far more playable state than it ever was on Vita… As long as the WiFi holds.

Verdict: While PS4 and PC are indeed the two best devices on which to enjoy PlayStation Now, losing support on Vita is a serious blow for many fans of the service, and of Sony’s long-suffering handheld.

Up Next: we explore how Now deals with visual downgrades and input lag.


www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Should You Give PlayStation Now Another Shot?

PlayStation Now is a premium service that first released in 2015, allowing subscribers to stream over 100 PS3 games to a variety of devices. The product of Sony’s $ 380 million acquisition of cloud streaming company Gaikai, expectations were high that the service would help to bring cloud-based gaming into the mainstream. However, a number of factors, such as an unexpectedly high price point, minimal selection of games, and frequent internet connection issues, kept the service from truly breaking out. While the service still has stalwart defenders, it’s fair to say that interest has waned.

While the service may have been written off by many, a lot can happen in just a couple of years. We took a look at Now’s most common complaints at launch and whether or not the grievances have been addressed and improved. More than two years later, is PlayStation Now worth another shot?


Complaint: Small Game Selection

Then: There was a lot of talk of PlayStation Now being dead on arrival, but Sony never gave up on supporting their investment into the cloud gaming platform. It launched with only about 100 games, but titles were continually added to the service. For a while, they only brought in a handful of titles per month, but that number has actually grown over time, with some months adding a dozen or more titles. Still, nothing can match November 2015, when Sony added an unprecedented 105 games, including titans such as Street Fighter, Resident Evil, Earth Defense Force, and a slew of SNK classics including King of Fighters and Fatal Fury.

Now: The number of games on PlayStation Now has grown from 100 to well over 460, and Sony is showing no signs of reining in their continued support for the service. There are some big-shot PlayStation exclusives like Heavy Rain, inFamous, the first three Uncharted games, and the entire God of War catalog, in addition to multiplatform heavies like BioShock, Tomb Raider, Dead Island, and Saints Row. Beyond that, there are also a slew of cult favorites (Dead to Rights: Retribution, Red Faction: Guerilla), arcade classics (Q*bert Rebooted, Namco Museum Essentials, Frogger Returns), and even a bunch of stinkers, which are good for little more than a cheap laugh (Heavy Fire: Afghanistan, Alien Rage).

Verdict: PlayStation Now’s greatest asset in 2017 is the sheer quantity of quality titles available for the service. From blockbuster action titles to JRPGs, there is plenty here for every type of gamer.


Complaint: High Price

Then: At launch, the cost of a PlayStation Now subscription was pretty steep: $ 20 a month, or $ 45 for three months. All told, that’s between $ 180 and $ 240 for a year of the service. For that kind of money, you could buy four years of PlayStation Plus or Xbox Live Gold, or raid your local used-game store for dozens of the older titles that are available on PS Now.

Now: In the years since that disappointing price point was announced, the cost of PlayStation Now hasn’t changed. However, they did put the service on sale, temporarily offering a 12-month subscription for $ 100, or less than nine bucks per month. It’s a mystery why this deal isn’t always in place, since $ 100 is competitive with streaming giants like Amazon and Netflix, of which PlayStation Now is striving to be the video game equivalent. That sale has come and gone twice over the past two years, so while it’s safe to assume it may return to that price at some point, new users are unable to take advantage of it at the moment.

Verdict: If the $ 100 annual subscription were to be made a permanent fixture, PlayStation Now would be a much more attractive option for gamers on a budget or who just don’t feel like putting down ~$ 200 in addition to their PS Plus subscription, game purchases, and myriad other expenses.


Complaint: Vita Troubles

Then: At launch, one of the most appealing aspects of PlayStation Now was that you could log in and play on either PS3, PS4, PlayStation Vita, or even certain Sony-branded televisions, as long as the local WiFi could take the heat.

The weak link in this chain, however, was always the PlayStation Vita. In theory, it’s the perfect device for the service; the Vita already supports Remote Play, in which PS4 games can be streamed from a console directly to the handheld, but users have had mixed experiences. Some of us regularly enjoy playing PS4 games on Sony’s handheld, while others simply cannot get a stable enough connection, leading to endless stuttering, lag, and crippled resolution – if they can get it working at all. To those without connection issues, PS4/Vita Remote Play works because developers can optimize their game’s controls to the Vita’s lack of extra shoulder buttons or clickable thumbsticks. For example, when playing Destiny on Vita, the sprint function is moved, by default, from L3 to down on the directional pad, making for a more natural gameplay experience on the handheld than if the function were mapped to the dreaded rear touch pad. On PlayStation Now, however, controller settings were not optimized for the Vita’s reduced button count, and all R2/L2 and R3/L3 functions are relegated to the touch pad without any option for customization.

Now: The Vita never did get around to allowing users to remap touch-pad functionality to button inputs, rendering titles like Saints Row 2 and Bodycount unplayable on PlayStation Now on Vita, save for the few players who invested in a third-party peripheral that added extra triggers to the system. Of course, that’s all moot now, with the surprise announcement that Now support for Vita (and PS3, Bravia televisions, Blu-ray players) is being dropped completely on August 15. Moving forward, Now will only be supported on PlayStation 4 and PC.

Last year, Sony added Now support to PCs, including laptops. Laptops are slightly less portable than the Vita, and the increasing marginalization of Sony’s underrated handheld is lamentable, but maybe this is the best solution; simply bring a laptop, a DualShock 4, and a Micro USB connector, and the entire PlayStation Now library is readily accessible in a far more playable state than it ever was on Vita… As long as the WiFi holds.

Verdict: While PS4 and PC are indeed the two best devices on which to enjoy PlayStation Now, losing support on Vita is a serious blow for many fans of the service, and of Sony’s long-suffering handheld.

Up Next: we explore how Now deals with visual downgrades and input lag.


www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

PlayStation Now Dropping Support For PlayStation 3, Vita, Other Devices

Sony and Gaikai's PlayStation Now streaming service is undergoing some major changes.

The platform, first launched in 2015, was originally marketed as a "Netflix for games" which players could enjoy across a variety of devices, including PS3, PS4, Vita, PC, and even Sony Bravia televisions and media players.

Starting on August 15th, nearly all of these devices will lose PS Now support. Moving forward, only PS4 and PC will remain compatible with the cloud-gaming service. This is being done, according to the statement on PlayStation Blog, to "improve the user experience on these two devices. This move puts us in the best position to grow the service even further."

[Source: Playstation Blog]

 

Our Take
PlayStation Now has a small-but-dedicated following, and many of them will be none-too-pleased with this surprising turn of events.  Hopefully, this isn't a sign that the service is being shut down for good. I am a regular user of PlayStation Now, and I mostly play on PS4. I played on Vita for a time, but ultimately found that playing on my laptop provided a far superior, and only slightly less portable, gameplay experience. Still, I'm gonna miss playing Strong Bad's Cool Game for Attractive People on Sony's underrated handheld.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Get a job: Sony PlayStation is hiring a Senior Environment Artist

Sony PlayStation is looking for a Senior Environment Artist with a specialized focus on creating environment/level assets to contribute to a triple-A project in Bend, Oregon. …


Gamasutra News

Report: Upcoming PlayStation 4 Update To Improve Performance Of Older Games On Pro Systems

Along with adding the option to use external hard drives, the PlayStation 4's 4.50 update (which is still in beta and offered only to a limited number of users) may also improve the performance of older games on the PlayStation 4 Pro.

The Verge reports the update includes a "Boost Mode" on PlayStation 4 Pro systems, which allows them to run "at a higher GPU and CPU clock speed" to improve performance for games released before the Pro was, allowing for reduced load times and higher framerates on some titles. The mode could cause glitches or errors in some games, however, which is why the mode can be turned on or off in the system menu. Currently, games released before the Pro run about the same on the system unless they're updated by the developers, and in some cases run worse. Though Boost Mode wouldn't give older games HDR options or allow for higher texture density, it should be a nice quality-of-life improvement.

We've reached out to Sony for comment and will update this article should they offer any details.

[Source: The Verge]

 

Our Take
As someone who has a Pro, it'd be cool if I could go back to games like Hitman or Bloodborne and see a performance boost. It'd make my purchase of a Pro a much better investment, especially if the load times are shorter between all my deaths against the Blood-Starved Beast. 

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