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The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Myths Get Put To The Test

Did you know that you can ride a tree trunk through the sky in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild? Or that you can steal a Hinox treasure without fighting it?

You might learn a few useful tips while watching this video from DefendTheHouse. Be sure to check out their other videos on Overwatch and Fallout 4.

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www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Myths Get Put To The Test

Did you know that you can ride a tree trunk through the sky in The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild? Or that you can steal a Hinox treasure without fighting it?

You might learn a few useful tips while watching this video from DefendTheHouse. Be sure to check out their other videos on Overwatch and Fallout 4.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

The Secret Music Of The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild

Among the many changes that Breath of the Wild brings to The Legend of Zelda series is its approach to music. In Link's latest adventure, the music is subdued making a powerful stirring appearance only when necessary. It, overall, lacks the familiar recurring themes of past Zelda games, but they are in the game – you just have to look for them.

In the video below, you will find a sampling of familiar Zelda tunes that snuck their way into the game. As is the case with nearly all of our Zelda coverage, make sure to look out for spoilers, but we can assure you that you won't see any late or end-game spoilers here.

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Great Fairy Fountain Theme
This music is not particularly secret, especially compared the music outlined below, but hearing the great fairy theme when meeting a Great Fairy for the first time was a surprise considering how little music you hear through the course of the rest of the game.

Epona's Song
Kass, A.K.A. the Weird Al of Hyrule, has his own theme, but for some inexplicable reason, he knows Epona's song. He tends to play it when you find him hanging around stables.

The Legend of Zelda Theme
Not only is it the most memorable music of the Zelda franchise, it is arguably one of the most notable themes in video game music in general. In sneaks in when Link rides his horse at night as the backing violin to the main piano piece.

Zelda's Lullaby
Much in the same way the main theme appears in the game, Zelda's lullaby sneaks in while Link is riding during the day. The music is protracted making it difficult to identfy behind the piano, but it's there if you're patient.

Dragon Roost Island Theme
In The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, Roost Island is home to the Rito Tribe. The Rito return for Breath of the Wild, but are less bird-like, and more full on bird. The theme you hear in Wind Waker returns here, but much like the music heard while Link is riding his horse, its callback is a subtle one.

Zora's Domain Theme
Like the Great Fairy theme, the music in Zora's Domain is included here more in credit for its surprising lack of subtlety. It is more-or-less the same theme heard in Zora's Domain in Ocarina of Time.

Great Fairy Fountain & Epona's Song
We saved the strangest music callback for last. We won't spoil where you find this theme or how it is linked to Breath of the Wild's Hyrule, but it's possible to find an area with a soundtrack that overlaps Epona's theme and the Great Fairy Fountain them in a strange, but admittedly appropriate way.

In one final music-related callback, there is a Shrine Quest mission that recalls Ocarina of Time's Song of Storms. You won't actually hear the familiar song in the game (or at least I haven't), but it does receive a nod.

I highly doubt that these are all of Breath of the Wild's musical callbacks. Let us know what we missed in the comments. And for more on Breath of the Wild, you can find out review here, as well as a number of other callbacks to previous Zelda games here.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

The Legend Of Zelda: Symphony Of The Goddesses 2017 Tour Dates Announced

The 2017 dates for The Legend of Zelda: Symphony of the Goddess tour have been announced, and the program includes music from Breath of the Wild, the return of "Ballad of the Wind Fish" from the tour's original program, a new movement from Skyward Sword, and more.

The tour kicks off on March 17 in Buenos Aires, Argentina, hits North America on May 20 in Minneapolis, and through the tour's end on December 30 in Salt Lake City, stops in Pittsburgh, Calgary, Barcelona, Durham, and many points in between.

The Symphony of the Goddess is a two-hour concert featuring a 66-piece orchestra, 24-person choir, and a video collage synced up to the music.

For a full list of the tour schedule and program info, head to the official site.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Nintendo Releases The Legend of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Making-Of Documentary

Update: The three-part series is now available on Nintendo's YouTube page. You can find the three parts below.

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Original story:

Nintendo of America announced the debut of The Making of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild, a three-part documentary series, via Twitter this morning. A trailer included in the tweet shows clips of concept art, musical scores, and interviews with key figures in the game's development.

The series debuts March 14, 2017 at 6 AM Pacific Standard Time.

Check out our review of Breath of the Wild, one of our top-scoring games of 2017, along with our discussion of the game on the GI Show and four reasons you should be excited about Link's latest adventure. You can learn much more about the development of Breath of the Wild by clicking the banner below.

[Source: Nintendo of America on Twitter]

 

Our Take
Given Breath of the Wild's popularity, this documentary series is well-timed. Fans should be eager for some commentary and behind-the-scenes content, while newcomers or those still hesitant can get a look at what everyone's talking about.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

How 45 Minutes With The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Convinced Me To Buy A Switch

I've never been a big Zelda fan. I mean, okay, yes – I love Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and A Link To The Past. But those are givens right? Classic staples, each one having a profound impact on game design and our idea of interactive adventures. But the others? Skyward Sword? Twilight Princess? The countless DS games? Not for me.

I approached Breath Of The Wild with a fair amount of skepticism. To be frank, the game wasn't even on my radar until our cover story last month. I remember coming around to the game a little bit when our video producer Ben Hanson described it as very systems-driven. I like systems-driven games. I like weird, freaky games that feel jumbled together and are rough and alive like Far Cry 2, so I was intrigued but not excited, especially in a season of games where we have riches like Yakuza 0, Nier: Automata, Mass Effect: Andromeda, and Horizon: Zero Dawn all either here or just around the bend.

Kyle's review and the constant bombardment of hilarious gifs on Twitter finally sparked my interest in full, as well as the fact I just happen to have a copy of the game, so that I had to go find out for myself what the heck everyone was raving about.

Last night a friend of mine and I went over to someone's house to play with the Switch and see The Legend of Zelda: Breath of The Wild in action. I played about 45 minutes of the game and when I left, I went home, hopped online, and paid an extra 50 dollars over retail price just to get a Switch to my door as soon as possible.

I played the game from the beginning and was struck by how odd and un-Zelda-like it was from the get-go, with Link waking up from what looked like long nap in a weird jacuzzi. And suddenly he had an Ancient Artifact That Totally Isn't A Smartphone Nope Nope in his hands. Breath Of The Wild is constantly introducing strange-but-wondrous nuggets of discovery. I emerged from the starting cavern out into the wilds and was immediately taken with just how gorgeous the environment was. I had seen screens of the game while we were prepping the issue but seeing this gorgeous, Ghibli-esque world in action, with leaves and grass blowing in the wind and mountains looking massive and imposing in the distance, I was immediately hit with a desire to explore every inch of this world.

I took off down the slope and immediately ran into a Bokoblin. I proceeded to beat him to death with a stick and laughed merrily as I did, the poor creature's corpse bouncing down the hill. Then I took a right and saw some apples on a tree. Surely they were scenery? Nope. I could jump up and smack them off the branches. A minute later I found a giant rock hanging atop a ledge. I brushed against it and watched, in amazement and horror, as it tumbled down, rolling into an unsuspecting group of Bokoblins below and killing one of them. The other did a panicked dance at the rock and ran around in horror. Even though I had murdered one of their kin not two minutes earlier, I felt a slight tingle of guilt, as everyone in the living room with me laughed at the unexpected causality that had just happened before us.

In her review of the game, I think Julie Muncy over at Wired nails why Breath Of The Wild is special:

For the past 20 years, this has been the order of the day for 3D Zelda games, and as a result they’ve grown staid, formulaic, and mildly dull. They all have the same scope, the same ambitions, and hit the same story beats. The most successful titles have attempted small, strange experiments in tone (2000’s Majora’s Mask) or recontextualized the formula in inventive ways (2002’s The Wind Waker) but none have bucked the formula entirely.

Breath of the Wild is the long-overdue obliteration of that structure. It has superficial resemblances to its predecessors – scripted moments and familiar plot beats in its vital places—but the body that delivers them could not be more different. It is quiet, beautiful, and remarkably lonely.

My time with Breath Of The Wild was fantastic because hardly a minute or two passed without me running into some action or event that left me feeling a child-like sense of wonder. I descended into a shrine and was suddenly given the ability to lift certain kinds of metal and throw them about telekinetically Magneto-style. I used my power to smash a robot to bits and construct bridges. Later on, I got the ability to use bombs from another shrine and then proceeded to roll them like bowling balls into Bokoblins, watching in delight as the explosions sent these poor fools soaring over cliffs and into each other.

The biggest skepticism I had for the game was that it was simply another open-world game but with the Zelda brand attached to it, and that's why people loved it. But Breath Of The Wild is more than that. Yes, it has parts ripped from other games. You can collect ingredients and cook them. There's a huge world filled with things to do and collect and explore. Yes, these are all things we've seen for years in other games, but Breath Of The Wild wraps them up and presents them in a way that makes them feel new and bold and innovative.

Back in 1998, I fondly remember playing Ocarina of Time on my Nintendo 64. It was one of the earliest, most transformative experiences I can recall as someone who plays video games. I'd stay up from dawn to dusk and from dusk to dawn exploring Hyrule, completing quests, and meeting all the local folks. I'd get up late while my parents were sleeping to play the game in our living room on low volume. At school, I'd dream of how to beat Ganondorf and I'd thumb through my copy of Tips & Tricks and memorize where all the heart pieces were. I couldn't tear myself away from that world no matter how hard I tried and I haven't felt this strongly about a Zelda game, or many other games, since. 

Even now my mind is drifting back to the plains of Hyrule in Breath of the Wild. I'm wondering where secrets lay hidden in temples and towers, in the bottoms of lakes, and what beasts await around the crumbled ruins in the distance. I've always been skeptical about whether or not "killer apps" are a thing or if any single piece of software was worth buying a console for.  However, Breath of the Wild has demolished that notion in less than an hour. The rest of the console's lineup can be a series of duds for all I care. There is something special about this Zelda. It has a soul. It trembles with wonder and delight, and I'm counting the hours until I can get back to saving the world.

For more on Breath Of The Wild, be sure to check out our podcast roundtable discussion on the game here or our cover story content by clicking on the banner below.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

How 45 Minutes With The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Convinced Me To Buy A Switch

I've never been a big Zelda fan. I mean, okay, yes – I love Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and A Link To The Past. But those are givens right? Classic staples, each one having a profound impact on game design and our idea of interactive adventures. But the others? Skyward Sword? Twilight Princess? The countless DS games? Not for me.

I approached Breath Of The Wild with a fair amount of skepticism. To be frank, the game wasn't even on my radar until our cover story last month. I remember coming around to the game a little bit when our video producer Ben Hanson described it as very systems-driven. I like systems-driven games. I like weird, freaky games that feel jumbled together and are rough and alive like Far Cry 2, so I was intrigued but not excited, especially in a season of games where we have riches like Yakuza 0, Nier: Automata, Mass Effect: Andromeda, and Horizon: Zero Dawn all either here or just around the bend.

Kyle's review and the constant bombardment of hilarious gifs on Twitter finally sparked my interest in full, as well as the fact I just happen to have a copy of the game, so that I had to go find out for myself what the heck everyone was raving about.

Last night a friend of mine and I went over to someone's house to play with the Switch and see The Legend of Zelda: Breath of The Wild in action. I played about 45 minutes of the game and when I left, I went home, hopped online, and paid an extra 50 dollars over retail price just to get a Switch to my door as soon as possible.

I played the game from the beginning and was struck by how odd and un-Zelda-like it was from the get-go, with Link waking up from what looked like long nap in a weird jacuzzi. And suddenly he had an Ancient Artifact That Totally Isn't A Smartphone Nope Nope in his hands. Breath Of The Wild is constantly introducing strange-but-wondrous nuggets of discovery. I emerged from the starting cavern out into the wilds and was immediately taken with just how gorgeous the environment was. I had seen screens of the game while we were prepping the issue but seeing this gorgeous, Ghibli-esque world in action, with leaves and grass blowing in the wind and mountains looking massive and imposing in the distance, I was immediately hit with a desire to explore every inch of this world.

I took off down the slope and immediately ran into a Bokoblin. I proceeded to beat him to death with a stick and laughed merrily as I did, the poor creature's corpse bouncing down the hill. Then I took a right and saw some apples on a tree. Surely they were scenery? Nope. I could jump up and smack them off the branches. A minute later I found a giant rock hanging atop a ledge. I brushed against it and watched, in amazement and horror, as it tumbled down, rolling into an unsuspecting group of Bokoblins below and killing one of them. The other did a panicked dance at the rock and ran around in horror. Even though I had murdered one of their kin not two minutes earlier, I felt a slight tingle of guilt, as everyone in the living room with me laughed at the unexpected causality that had just happened before us.

In her review of the game, I think Julie Muncy over at Wired nails why Breath Of The Wild is special:

For the past 20 years, this has been the order of the day for 3D Zelda games, and as a result they’ve grown staid, formulaic, and mildly dull. They all have the same scope, the same ambitions, and hit the same story beats. The most successful titles have attempted small, strange experiments in tone (2000’s Majora’s Mask) or recontextualized the formula in inventive ways (2002’s The Wind Waker) but none have bucked the formula entirely.

Breath of the Wild is the long-overdue obliteration of that structure. It has superficial resemblances to its predecessors – scripted moments and familiar plot beats in its vital places—but the body that delivers them could not be more different. It is quiet, beautiful, and remarkably lonely.

My time with Breath Of The Wild was fantastic because hardly a minute or two passed without me running into some action or event that left me feeling a child-like sense of wonder. I descended into a shrine and was suddenly given the ability to lift certain kinds of metal and throw them about telekinetically Magneto-style. I used my power to smash a robot to bits and construct bridges. Later on, I got the ability to use bombs from another shrine and then proceeded to roll them like bowling balls into Bokoblins, watching in delight as the explosions sent these poor fools soaring over cliffs and into each other.

The biggest skepticism I had for the game was that it was simply another open-world game but with the Zelda brand attached to it, and that's why people loved it. But Breath Of The Wild is more than that. Yes, it has parts ripped from other games. You can collect ingredients and cook them. There's a huge world filled with things to do and collect and explore. Yes, these are all things we've seen for years in other games, but Breath Of The Wild wraps them up and presents them in a way that makes them feel new and bold and innovative.

Back in 1998, I fondly remember playing Ocarina of Time on my Nintendo 64. It was one of the earliest, most transformative experiences I can recall as someone who plays video games. I'd stay up from dawn to dusk and from dusk to dawn exploring Hyrule, completing quests, and meeting all the local folks. I'd get up late while my parents were sleeping to play the game in our living room on low volume. At school, I'd dream of how to beat Ganondorf and I'd thumb through my copy of Tips & Tricks and memorize where all the heart pieces were. I couldn't tear myself away from that world no matter how hard I tried and I haven't felt this strongly about a Zelda game, or many other games, since. 

Even now my mind is drifting back to the plains of Hyrule in Breath of the Wild. I'm wondering where secrets lay hidden in temples and towers, in the bottoms of lakes, and what beasts await around the crumbled ruins in the distance. I've always been skeptical about whether or not "killer apps" are a thing or if any single piece of software was worth buying a console for.  However, Breath of the Wild has demolished that notion in less than an hour. The rest of the console's lineup can be a series of duds for all I care. There is something special about this Zelda. It has a soul. It trembles with wonder and delight, and I'm counting the hours until I can get back to saving the world.

For more on Breath Of The Wild, be sure to check out our podcast roundtable discussion on the game here or our cover story content by clicking on the banner below.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

How 45 Minutes With The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Convinced Me To Buy A Switch

I've never been a big Zelda fan. I mean, okay, yes – I love Ocarina of Time, Majora's Mask, and A Link To The Past. But those are givens right? Classic staples, each one having a profound impact on game design and our idea of interactive adventures. But the others? Skyward Sword? Twilight Princess? The countless DS games? Not for me.

I approached Breath Of The Wild with a fair amount of skepticism. To be frank, the game wasn't even on my radar until our cover story last month. I remember coming around to the game a little bit when our video producer Ben Hanson described it as very systems-driven. I like systems-driven games. I like weird, freaky games that feel jumbled together and are rough and alive like Far Cry 2, so I was intrigued but not excited, especially in a season of games where we have riches like Yakuza 0, Nier: Automata, Mass Effect: Andromeda, and Horizon: Zero Dawn all either here or just around the bend.

Kyle's review and the constant bombardment of hilarious gifs on Twitter finally sparked my interest in full, as well as the fact I just happen to have a copy of the game, so that I had to go find out for myself what the heck everyone was raving about.

Last night a friend of mine and I went over to someone's house to play with the Switch and see The Legend of Zelda: Breath of The Wild in action. I played about 45 minutes of the game and when I left, I went home, hopped online, and paid an extra 50 dollars over retail price just to get a Switch to my door as soon as possible.

I played the game from the beginning and was struck by how odd and un-Zelda-like it was from the get-go, with Link waking up from what looked like long nap in a weird jacuzzi. And suddenly he had an Ancient Artifact That Totally Isn't A Smartphone Nope Nope in his hands. Breath Of The Wild is constantly introducing strange-but-wondrous nuggets of discovery. I emerged from the starting cavern out into the wilds and was immediately taken with just how gorgeous the environment was. I had seen screens of the game while we were prepping the issue but seeing this gorgeous, Ghibli-esque world in action, with leaves and grass blowing in the wind and mountains looking massive and imposing in the distance, I was immediately hit with a desire to explore every inch of this world.

I took off down the slope and immediately ran into a Bokoblin. I proceeded to beat him to death with a stick and laughed merrily as I did, the poor creature's corpse bouncing down the hill. Then I took a right and saw some apples on a tree. Surely they were scenery? Nope. I could jump up and smack them off the branches. A minute later I found a giant rock hanging atop a ledge. I brushed against it and watched, in amazement and horror, as it tumbled down, rolling into an unsuspecting group of Bokoblins below and killing one of them. The other did a panicked dance at the rock and ran around in horror. Even though I had murdered one of their kin not two minutes earlier, I felt a slight tingle of guilt, as everyone in the living room with me laughed at the unexpected causality that had just happened before us.

In her review of the game, I think Julie Muncy over at Wired nails why Breath Of The Wild is special:

For the past 20 years, this has been the order of the day for 3D Zelda games, and as a result they’ve grown staid, formulaic, and mildly dull. They all have the same scope, the same ambitions, and hit the same story beats. The most successful titles have attempted small, strange experiments in tone (2000’s Majora’s Mask) or recontextualized the formula in inventive ways (2002’s The Wind Waker) but none have bucked the formula entirely.

Breath of the Wild is the long-overdue obliteration of that structure. It has superficial resemblances to its predecessors – scripted moments and familiar plot beats in its vital places—but the body that delivers them could not be more different. It is quiet, beautiful, and remarkably lonely.

My time with Breath Of The Wild was fantastic because hardly a minute or two passed without me running into some action or event that left me feeling a child-like sense of wonder. I descended into a shrine and was suddenly given the ability to lift certain kinds of metal and throw them about telekinetically Magneto-style. I used my power to smash a robot to bits and construct bridges. Later on, I got the ability to use bombs from another shrine and then proceeded to roll them like bowling balls into Bokoblins, watching in delight as the explosions sent these poor fools soaring over cliffs and into each other.

The biggest skepticism I had for the game was that it was simply another open-world game but with the Zelda brand attached to it, and that's why people loved it. But Breath Of The Wild is more than that. Yes, it has parts ripped from other games. You can collect ingredients and cook them. There's a huge world filled with things to do and collect and explore. Yes, these are all things we've seen for years in other games, but Breath Of The Wild wraps them up and presents them in a way that makes them feel new and bold and innovative.

Back in 1998, I fondly remember playing Ocarina of Time on my Nintendo 64. It was one of the earliest, most transformative experiences I can recall as someone who plays video games. I'd stay up from dawn to dusk and from dusk to dawn exploring Hyrule, completing quests, and meeting all the local folks. I'd get up late while my parents were sleeping to play the game in our living room on low volume. At school, I'd dream of how to beat Ganondorf and I'd thumb through my copy of Tips & Tricks and memorize where all the heart pieces were. I couldn't tear myself away from that world no matter how hard I tried and I haven't felt this strongly about a Zelda game, or many other games, since. 

Even now my mind is drifting back to the plains of Hyrule in Breath of the Wild. I'm wondering where secrets lay hidden in temples and towers, in the bottoms of lakes, and what beasts await around the crumbled ruins in the distance. I've always been skeptical about whether or not "killer apps" are a thing or if any single piece of software was worth buying a console for.  However, Breath of the Wild has demolished that notion in less than an hour. The rest of the console's lineup can be a series of duds for all I care. There is something special about this Zelda. It has a soul. It trembles with wonder and delight, and I'm counting the hours until I can get back to saving the world.

For more on Breath Of The Wild, be sure to check out our podcast roundtable discussion on the game here or our cover story content by clicking on the banner below.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Weekend Warrior – The Legend Of Logan: Call Of The Wild

As many of you surely already know, today is the launch of the console/handheld hybrid, the Nintendo Switch. The Wii U failed to gain traction among the gaming community, but hopefully this new system will reverse Nintendo's fortunes. The fact that it's arriving with a brand new Legend of Zelda title is certainly a boon for the system, even if Breath of the Wild is also available on Wii U. Meanwhile, the most famous X-Men member of them all, Wolverine, embarks on his final journey in Logan, the R-rated finale to the adventure which began seventeen years ago in the very first X-Men movie.

When are you planning to buy a Switch? Will you be seeing Logan? Sound off in the comments below, and check out what GI's best and brightest are up to this weekend.

Brian Shea (@BrianPShea) – I’ll be getting my Switch later today and then I’ll be throwing myself into Hyrule. I’ve been looking forward to Breath of the Wild for a long time, and now that it’s here, I can’t wait to dig in. When I’m not doing that, I’ll probably find some time to play Overwatch and Pokémon Go.

Ben Hanson (@yozetty) – This weekend will be devoted to The Legend of Zelda. On a Nintendo Switch. While I wear gym shorts. And drink wine. And make Miis. What a good weekend. 

Andrew Reiner (@Andrew_Reiner) – ZEEEEEELLLLLLDAAAAA

Jeff Cork (@gijeff) – After years of disappointment, I’ve taken matters into my own hands. I dusted off the ol’ GameCube a few days ago, and I’m playing through Chibi-Robo! again. Now I don’t have to worry about yet another rigged Super Replay Showdown standing in the way of me and my beloved hero. Sure, I’m not on the clock, but revisiting the Sanderson family again is its own reward. I may check out some more Horizon, too, but priorities…

Manon Hume (@ManonHume) – I’ll be drowning my “I don’t have a Switch yet” sorrows with copious amounts of croissants and pain au chocolat at Minneapolis’ Alliance Française. I also plan to finally pick up Horizon Zero Dawn – robo-dinos, prepare yourselves!

Kristin Williams (@kristincreate) – I'll be doing Horizon Zero Dawn this weekend.  I actually have a fairly free weekend (other than seeing Logan tonight) so I'm looking forward to having some good downtime with that game.

Suriel Vasquez (@SurielVasquez) – I’m diving in head-first into Zelda this weekend, but I’ll probably dive into a couple of other things as well. Fast Racing Neo piqued my interest when it came out on Wii U but I never pulled the trigger on it, so RMX on the Switch seems like a good time to check it out. I’ll also be playing quite a bit of Destiny’s Iron Banner this weekend and maybe some For Honor, if I can squeeze it in.

Wade Wojcik (@WadeWojcik) – With the Nintendo Switch out today and Breath of the Wild waiting in my mailbox, I’ll be playing the new Zelda until I stumble into the office with bloodshot eyes on Monday morning. Just kidding everyone. …I’ll be sick Monday morning.

Zak Wojnar (@ZakWojnar) – Zelda? Horizon? Halo Wars 2? I'm sure those are all solid titles, but I'll be spending my free time this weekend gunning for all the stars in Riptide GP Renegade. After devouring Riptide GP 2 like some kind of ravenous beast, I tried the sequel, but it just didn't grab me… However, I went back to it earlier this week and it sucked me in like nothing else in recent memory. I've just maxed out the stats on my Cruiser and opened up the final set of bonus challenges, so I'm ready to ride the waves until those stars are mine, all mine!

I must admit, however, to being really excited for Breath of the Wild. I really like the rag doll effect when Link smacks goblins around with his axe. That kid's got a mean swing, and that lovely parabolic arc in which they go flying brings me a simple cathartic joy. I also like how they fixed the fishing mechanics, in that I don't need to use a fishing rod, I can just shoot fish out of the water with my bow and arrow. I don't know when I'm gonna be able to scrape together the money for a Switch, but Link, Zelda, Epona… In due time, we will adventure together.

As for Logan, I won't be seeing that until Tuesday, but my anticipation is high. Hey, wanna hear some soulful and earthy New York City music? Check out Sorries and then thank me on Twitter. Have a good weekend, everyone!

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

The Legend Of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild Wii U Versus Switch Impressions

We have spent a lot of time with The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild on Switch, and it’s a very good game. Though that version is getting the most attention, the title is also available today on Wii U. If you don’t want to invest in Nintendo’s new console, is Breath of the Wild worth picking up on Wii U?

We spent an hour and a half with the Wii U version of the game, playing through the beginning and entering the larger open world. After completing the tasks of the opening plateau, we headed southeast to a densely forested area where I encountered some minor slowdown on the Switch version in order to take a comparison. In this area of the map, the performance of the two games was as identical as my naked eye is capable of perceiving. I did notice some slowdown in the Wii U version that was not in the Switch version, like when I encountered a larger group of bokoblins in the opening area. The slowdown passed by quickly, and from my time on Wii U, did not appear to be a persistent problem. Applying assorted framerate trackers and direct side-by-side comparisons might deliver different results, but the the game still feels great based on my playtime.

The short answer to the big question is an optimistic one. If you aren’t interested in Switch, but are interested in Zelda, the Wii U version appears to be a perfectly acceptable way to enjoy Link’s new adventure. The game is structurally identical, plays well, and has no exclusive content in either iteration. Surprisingly, the Wii U version doesn’t even take advantage of the Game Pad screen to outsource item management or Link’s map – a feature that could have been a nice bonus for the Wii U version.

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Watch us play the first 50 minutes of the Wii U version of Breath of the Wild.

The Switch version of the game has higher-quality audio and runs in 900p in TV mode, but the Wii U version’s audio is still good, and the 720p disparity is hard to notice. The game also benefits from an art style that excels without the need for extreme detail. The only time the visual difference is severe is when you take the game to Wii U’s gamepad screen and compare it to playing the Switch version in handheld mode. In this situation, the Switch version looks markedly better.

To reiterate the answer to the big question: Yes, the Wii U version of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild stands comfortably beside the Switch version. The game is better on Switch, but only marginally. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is fantastic, and all the important factors that made it a 10 in our review are intact in the Wii U version.

For more on the Wii U version of the game, watch us play the first 50 minutes of the game here. For our review of the Switch version of the game here.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed