Master of The Free World Productions | Jumpcut Entertainment Network

Dragon Quest VIII: Journey Of The Cursed King Hits 3DS In January

Nintendo has announced that Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King – a remake of the PS2 game out originally here in 2005 – is coming to the 3DS in January.

The game comes out on the system on January 20, and features new story content, two new playable characters, more quests, an alternative ending, and more.

The title also includes a quick save function, a speed up feature to get through encounters quicker, and the ability to take photos outside of battles and cutscenes and share them via StreetPass.

[Source: Nintendo]

 

Our Take
It's been a while since the original, but these additional features seem pretty cool.

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Some Big Horror Hits Are Getting Spooky Sales On PSN And Xbox Live

If Christmas inching ever-closer wasn't enough to scare your bank balance then these Halloween sales might just do the job. There are some impressive deals on both consoles, with some multi-platform games seeing similar discounts. Resident Evil 4 which we recently finished a Super Replay on, is one of the highlights of either sale, though the PSN one is $ 3 cheaper at $ 11.99.

PlayStation users have plenty of frights to choose from. The newly remastered Dead Rising games are discounted up to $ 13.99 if you need some more interesting ways to kill zombies. There's even a few cross-buy delights with Grim Fandango:Remastered, Neverending Nightmares, Paranautical Activity, and Poltergeist: A Pixelated Horror all getting their price tags trimmed. The wonderfully unique Oxenfree is also on sale, in three different flavors depending on if you want a theme or extra PSN avatars.

On the Xbox side of things, it starts off big with Mortal Kombat XL for $ 32.49. Dying Light is also reasonably priced if psychological horror is more your speed. The Resident Evil sales continue with 0, 5, and 6 available for both Xbox platforms. Finally, Dead Space is dirt cheap at $ 4.54 and is backwards compatible with Xbox One, which makes it almost perfect for the sale.

[Source: PlayStation Store via NeoGAFMajor Nelson]

 

Our Take
I'll take any excuse to get into the Halloween spirit, so I already bought some of these games when I heard they were on sale. It's super exciting to see Catherine for under $ 5, but now I remember that I still need to beat it. Mortal Kombat seems like an awesome pick for this sale as well, though I wish they would've added Gears of War 4 into the mix too.

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Acrobatic 2D Shooter Seraph Hits PlayStation 4 In November

Dreadbit's Seraph, a shooter/platformer hybrid that released for PC on Steam earlier this year, is making its way to PlayStation 4 on November 1. You play as an angel called Seraph, who aims to recover her lost power and escape a demon-filled prison. 

What's most interesting about the game is its twist on aiming. Seraph will automatically aim for you. She chooses who to target with her arsenal of firearms, and the player instead focuses on her moves and acrobats during combat.

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Seraph also includes an adaptive difficulty mechanic, where depending on your performance, the enemies will become harder if you do better. The more you improve, the better the rewards. All levels are procedurally generated with enemies and items, and you can also craft yourself new weapons, protective wards, and more.

You can check out Seraph on Steam by heading here.

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Revamped Slain: Back From Hell Hits Xbox One Today

After being released on PC then pulled then released again on PC and PS4, Slain: Back from Hell is coming to Xbox One today for $ 14.99.

Slain: Back from Hell is a gothic-tinted action-platformer with obvious Konami-inspired roots. But its original PC release in March was met with overwhelmingly negative feedback when players played a poor, "reckless" game instead of the game they thought they were promised. Developer Wolf Brew Games acknowledged the criticism and came back in August with a whole new game with an exhaustive but necessary changelist.

The combat, dialogue, difficulty, bosses, enemies, and more were all overhauled, improved, and streamlined for this Back from Hell release.

The PlayStation Vita version will be released on November 1 and will be Cross-Buy with the PlayStation 4 version that is already out.

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Our Take
Plenty of bad games stay bad so it's refreshing that Slain has gotten a second chance. Granted, it was funded through Kickstarter so if there's a base to please, it's the people that helped you make your game in the first place. But now that Slain looks to be a decent game, it's good to spread the love on more platforms.

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Thumper Review – Don’t Expect The Hits

Thumper is the last thing a beetle imagines when it smacks into a windshield. Thumper is what it’s like to peer into the subconscious of the guitar-playing Doof Warrior from Mad Max: Fury Road. Thumper is a rhythm game stripped down to the rims – a primal, uncomfortable nightmare by design. Though it shares a few DNA strands with other games out there, Thumper is its own unique beast – a mean, unrelenting animal that I wanted to put down after a few hours.

You control a metallic beetle traveling along an autoscrolling trough. You move at a blistering speed, accompanied by a pounding, percussive score. As strange as a metallic beetle may be, it’s that score that sets the game apart from other rhythm games you’ve played. It sounds like something ripped from a dystopian movie, and it’s striking and hypnotic. Unfortunately, it can’t maintain the rest of the game.

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When you begin, you only have a few different things to concern yourself with. You can pick up score-enhancing objects by pressing a button as you pass over them. Holding the button down will allow you to pass through hazards that would otherwise damage your bug. You need to steer through tight turns and jump over spikes or take the hit. Your beetle may be made of chrome, but it’s fragile; take two hits, and you have to replay the stretch you died on – a process that may take you back anywhere from a few seconds to a minute or more. Additional elements, such as widened lanes and enemies, are added as the game progresses, but the core remains.

Unlike traditional music/rhythm games, which focus on a playlist of individual songs, Thumper’s soundtrack doesn’t offer much variety. The sounds move through the levels continuously, rarely changing or building into anything larger. It actually works to its favor in the short term, helping to create a sense of dread and an almost hypnotic state. After a few hours, however, it’s a real bummer. It doesn’t provide those moments of catharsis that come with great music games, and nailing a difficult section – of which there are plenty – doesn’t change the audio landscape in any significant ways. You’re just a bug, propelled along a track, your own personal feelings be damned.

The game starts off fairly easy, but it quickly escalates. I had a tricky time reliably pulling off a couple of maneuvers, such as one where your bug briefly goes airborne and slams back to the trough, which added to the frustration. Even when I pulled things off flawlessly, I sensed a disconnect between my actions and the rhythms that I was hearing. And I lost count of how many times I was certain that I turned perfectly, only to watch as my beetle shattered against the wall. You don’t have any difficulty settings to play around with in Thumper, so as with the rest of the game, you experience it on its own terms.

I enjoy challenging games when there’s a rewarding payoff. With Thumper, the reward of doing well is just more Thumper. If you’re really into the game’s bleak conceit, you may have the patience to hang with it for the duration. Personally, I was ready to leap out of the trough and never look back. 

Thumper In VR
Thumper can be played on traditional displays, but it works quite well with the PlayStation 4’s VR. The visuals are still sparse and abstract, but it adds a sense of being present for it all. That sensation comes through whether you're looking at the trough behind you or seeing the fragments of your dead bug scatter all around you. It’s definitely not worth buying the hardware for on its own – and I can’t enthusiastically recommend Thumper regardless – but it’s worth experiencing for a while at least.

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That Dragon, Cancer Hits iPhones And iPads

The Green family shared the heartbreaking story of their young son Joel's battle with cancer in That Dragon, Cancer. Now they're ready to introduce a new audience to Joel by launching the game on iOS. 

Starting today, the game is available on iPhones and iPads. 

That Dragon, Cancer is as much about celebrating Joel's life, as it about The Green's coping with the inevitability of Joel's disease. Our own Jeff Marchiafava discussed his time with the game and said, "The experience is both depressing and at times uplifting; it warms as it rends."

For more on the game, check out Jeff Marchiafava's in depth thoughts

For those interested in learning more about The Green family and the game, a documentary on That Dragon, Cancer's creation called Thank You For Playing airs October 24 on PBS. "We love that the documentary, created by David Osit and Malika Zouhali-Worrall, allows people to see Joel and get a glimpse into our lives beyond the abstraction of the video game," says Joel's mother Amy Green. You can watch a trailer for it here.

 

Our Take
I'm glad that more people can experience Joel's story. This game is an amazing tribute to him. 

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

That Dragon, Cancer Hits iPhones And iPads

The Green family shared the heartbreaking story of their young son Joel's battle with cancer in That Dragon, Cancer. Now they're ready to introduce a new audience to Joel by launching the game on iOS. 

Starting today, the game is available on iPhones and iPads. 

That Dragon, Cancer is as much about celebrating Joel's life, as it about The Green's coping with the inevitability of Joel's disease. Our own Jeff Marchiafava discussed his time with the game and said, "The experience is both depressing and at times uplifting; it warms as it rends."

For more on the game, check out Jeff Marchiafava's in depth thoughts

For those interested in learning more about The Green family and the game, a documentary on That Dragon, Cancer's creation called Thank You For Playing airs October 24 on PBS. "We love that the documentary, created by David Osit and Malika Zouhali-Worrall, allows people to see Joel and get a glimpse into our lives beyond the abstraction of the video game," says Joel's mother Amy Green. You can watch a trailer for it here.

 

Our Take
I'm glad that more people can experience Joel's story. This game is an amazing tribute to him. 

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

The Golf Club Hits The VR Links On The HTC Vive

HB Studios is bringing The Golf Club to the HTC Vive by the end of the year, and along with it comes the existing title's over 130,000 golf courses created by the developer and the community.

The game uses a single controller as your club (which also interacts with the environment), and also introduces the ability to analyze your shots and view hole information with an in-game virtual smartwatch.

While the VR title hosts the courses created from users so far, it does not allow you to make your own courses like the original Golf Club game.

No price or specific release date have been announced yet for the title.

For more on the Vive itself, check out our review of the unit.

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Our Take
While The Golf Club VR is a separate release from either the original Golf Club or the forthcoming Golf Club 2, It will be interesting to see as time goes on and if VR sticks around, if it is integrated into the main franchise titles. This is currently not common, as most of the VR offerings are standalone releases.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Darkest Dungeon Hits PS4 And Vita On September 27

Darkest Dungeon hits PS4 and Vita on September 27, and Red Hook Studios has released a new trailer showcasing some of the action players can expect as they unearth the horrors lurking beneath. The trailer includes accolades from the PC launch much earlier this year  and some gameplay.

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Darkest Dungeon is definitely one of my favorite games that hit this year, an uncompromising dungeon dive with a unique aesthetic and unforgettable characters. I'm excited to see how some of the improvements that have trickled out into the PC version resonate with a whole new audience as the title comes to console and handheld. Check out my review of the PC version here! (Any game that lets me use the word aphotic is automatically awesome in my book.)

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Game Industry Parody Dawn Of The Devs Hits Kickstarter

Underdog studios has announced a Kickstarter for a strange project: a puzzle-platforming game featuring famous game designers as the leads.

Well, not quite. Instead of using the actual likenesses of the game designers themselves, Dawn of the Devs lets you play as Hiro Komiya (Hideo Kojima), Biff Klozinski (Cliff Bleszinski) and Tom Schiffer (Tim Schafer), solving puzzles and using each character's unique traits to overcome obstacles. Tom has an adventure game-style cursor and inventory, Biff uses a gun with a chainsaw affixed to its barrel, and Hiro can hide in a cardboard box and lure enemies near him.

Dawn of the Devs also has characters resembling Shigeru Miyamoto, Gabe Newell, Peter Molyneux, as stretch goals. It also features villains which revolve around gaming stereotypes such as internet trolls, software pirates, and mindless fans. The game is currently at around $ 6,000 of its $ 60,000 goal with 29 days to go as of this writing.

 

Our Take
It's hard to know if the game will turn out well from the trailer (or if the project will even get funded). That said, everyone's going to have their roster omissions to fuss over. Where's Roberta Williams? Suda Goichi? Amy Hennig? The more designers included, the better.

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