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Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age Collector’s Edition Detailed

The highly-anticipated PS4 port of Final Fantasy XII is getting a pair of special editions; select retailers will carry the Limited Edition, which packs the game in a fancy steelbook case and includes a code to unlock the original background music during the game. Presumably, this will be released as premium DLC at some point down the line for purchasers of the base game.

Meanwhile, the Collector's Edition contains the steelbook (though with different art) and DLC code, but also a slew of additional goodies, including a set of six art cards featuring characters from the game, a selection of soundtrack music, and a set of mini busts. These statues display the visages of five of FFXII's intimidating Judges, and are exclusive to the Collector's Edition; they will not be sold separately.

The standard version of The Zodiac Age and the Limited Edtion both retail for $ 49.99. However, the Collector's Edition costs a whopping $ 199.99, and is only available to pre-order at the Square Enix online store.

Final Fantasy XII: The Zodiac Age launches on July 11, exclusively for PlayStation 4. For more on the improvements present in the upcoming remaster, check out GI's interview with The Zodiac Age's director and producer.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Hands-On With Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus

At PAX East 2017, I played around 30 minutes of the upcoming Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus (The full DLC should take around 2-3 hours to complete). While story spoilers are off the table, I'm eager to share just how Gladiolus plays.

I had a lot more fun with Gladiolus than I ever did with Noctis. Gladiolus features an in-your-face smashy-smashy playstyle that's all about huge offense and precise defense. Through attacking, Gladiolus charges up powerful moves, often area-of-effect attacks, that dish out tremendous damage. But that's not all, Gladiolus is much more than an attack spammer. A block/guard ability allows Gladiolus to prevent incoming damage and negate attacks, and if you time it right, builds up a rage meter that can add a ridiculous multiplier to your outgoing damage. 

Your blocks must be precise in order to really get the meter going though, so you must pay careful attention to enemy movements and attack signals. If you can time the block just before an incoming attack lands, you'll build your rage in addition to leaving the enemy vulnerable to devastating attacks.

I took down two bosses in the DLC, and I have to say, it really felt like there was a little bit of Dark Souls inspiration behind some of the enemies and bosses, which I loved. Because you need to play Gladiolus with a completely different playstyle than Noctis, with different tools at your disposal, each fight was quite refreshing.

In true Gladiolus flavor, there's also a segment where you can actually rip pillars right out of the ground and crush your enemies with them. This segment is really in-sync with the style and flavor of all that is Gladiolus, and was my favorite part of the demo.

While I can't spoil the story, I can say that I found the tale from Gladiolus' past to fit the character well, and while almost hilariously cliché, fairly effective and compelling.

I'm looking forward to checking out the full DLC when it launches later this month, and this demo gave me high hopes for other character DLC coming online, with characters that play  and feel much different than Noctis. I really don't like Noctis. Heck, let us play as Ardyn.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Hands-On With Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus

At PAX East 2017, I played around 30 minutes of the upcoming Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus (The full DLC should take around 2-3 hours to complete). While story spoilers are off the table, I'm eager to share just how Gladiolus plays.

I had a lot more fun with Gladiolus than I ever did with Noctis. Gladiolus features an in-your-face smashy-smashy playstyle that's all about huge offense and precise defense. Through attacking, Gladiolus charges up powerful moves, often area-of-effect attacks, that dish out tremendous damage. But that's not all, Gladiolus is much more than an attack spammer. A block/guard ability allows Gladiolus to prevent incoming damage and negate attacks, and if you time it right, builds up a rage meter that can add a ridiculous multiplier to your outgoing damage. 

Your blocks must be precise in order to really get the meter going though, so you must pay careful attention to enemy movements and attack signals. If you can time the block just before an incoming attack lands, you'll build your rage in addition to leaving the enemy vulnerable to devastating attacks.

I took down two bosses in the DLC, and I have to say, it really felt like there was a little bit of Dark Souls inspiration behind some of the enemies and bosses, which I loved. Because you need to play Gladiolus with a completely different playstyle than Noctis, with different tools at your disposal, each fight was quite refreshing.

In true Gladiolus flavor, there's also a segment where you can actually rip pillars right out of the ground and crush your enemies with them. This segment really in-sync with the style and flavor of all that is Gladiolus, and was my favorite part of the demo.

While I can't spoil the story, I can say that I found the tale from Gladiolus' past to fit the character well, and while almost hilariously cliché, fairly effective and compelling.

I'm looking forward to checking out the full DLC when it launches later this month, and this demo gave me high hopes for other character DLC coming online, with characters that play  and feel much different than Noctis. I really don't like Noctis. Heck, let us play as Ardyn.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Hands-On With Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus

At PAX East 2017, I played around 30 minutes of the upcoming Final Fantasy XV: Episode Gladiolus (The full DLC should take around 2-3 hours to complete). While story spoilers are off the table, I'm eager to share just how Gladiolus plays.

I had a lot more fun with Gladiolus than I ever did with Noctis. Gladiolus features an in-your-face smashy-smashy playstyle that's all about huge offense and precise defense. Through attacking, Gladiolus charges up powerful moves, often area-of-effect attacks, that dish out tremendous damage. But that's not all, Gladiolus is much more than an attack spammer. A block/guard ability allows Gladiolus to prevent incoming damage and negate attacks, and if you time it right, builds up a rage meter that can add a ridiculous multiplier to your outgoing damage. 

Your blocks must be precise in order to really get the meter going though, so you must pay careful attention to enemy movements and attack signals. If you can time the block just before an incoming attack lands, you'll build your rage in addition to leaving the enemy vulnerable to devastating attacks.

I took down two bosses in the DLC, and I have to say, it really felt like there was a little bit of Dark Souls inspiration behind some of the enemies and bosses, which I loved. Because you need to play Gladiolus with a completely different playstyle than Noctis, with different tools at your disposal, each fight was quite refreshing.

In true Gladiolus flavor, there's also a segment where you can actually rip pillars right out of the ground and crush your enemies with them. This segment really in-sync with the style and flavor of all that is Gladiolus, and was my favorite part of the demo.

While I can't spoil the story, I can say that I found the tale from Gladiolus' past to fit the character well, and while almost hilariously cliché, fairly effective and compelling.

I'm looking forward to checking out the full DLC when it launches later this month, and this demo gave me high hopes for other character DLC coming online, with characters that play  and feel much different than Noctis. I really don't like Noctis. Heck, let us play as Ardyn.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Lunafreya Nox Fleuret To Join Final Fantasy XV Play Arts Figure Line

As reported by Toyark, Square Enix announced that a new figure based on Lunafreya Nox Fleuret will be joining the Play Arts Figure Line. The figure will join Noctis, Prompto, Gladio and Ignis as the fifth figure based on Final Fantasy XV.  It is releasing in July in Japan, but currently has no announced western release date. The figure will cost around 13,000 Yen, or roughly $ 112. Luna Comes with her staff as an accessory, as well as four interchangeable hands. You can get a better look at the figure below.

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In other Final Fantasy merchandise news,  it was announced earlier this week that the Final Fantasy XV soundtrack will be making it's way to the U.S. in a physical format. You can read more about it here.

[Source: Toyark.com]

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

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Director Hajime Tabata Compares Final Fantasy XV Development To Climbing Mt. Denali

Today at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco,
Final Fantasy XV director Hajime Tabata took the stage to discuss some of the hardships and what he's learned while developing the game.

The stakes were always high for Final Fantasy XV, as the
team had to prove it could compete in this new generation of games. Tabata said
from the start of the project, the famed father of Final Fantasy Hironobu Sakaguchi
said, "This [is] our last chance." The series was in trouble,
and if Final Fantasy XV failed, the series couldn't live on. 

Tabata said since the stakes were so high, he also raised
his own bar. Original projections had the game selling under 5 million copies
worldwide; Tabata set a goal for his team to reach 6 million copies. Tabata
knew playing it safe wouldn't do. The team had to take risks if they wanted to
make a memorable game. This meant switching away from the turn-based combat the
series was known for and creating a more open world, something the team had
never done before. "The greatest goals can only be reached by taking chances,"
Tabata said in his talk.

Tabata, a skier, compared his evolution as a developer to
climbing mountains. His previous work was
on handheld and mobile games. He compared his previous games to different
mountain sizes, saying Crisis Core was like climbing Mt. Kitadake and Type-0
was akin to Mt. Fuji, but to really drive home the scope of ambition of Final
Fantasy XV, he used Mt. Denali, which has an elevation of 20,310 feet and is the highest mountain peak in North America, to illustrate the challenges in front of him. The elevation is close to double his other games. 

Tabata brought up many times the importance of his team at
Business Division 2, which was built for Final Fantasy XV. He said it was
integral that they work together, but he noticed after launching Episode Duscae
that his team's passion diminished. The demo was a proof of concept, but it
also showed the team how much work still needed to be done. To motivate his
team, Tabata decided to have a Family Day, after his six-year-old daughter one
morning asked him, "How much longer do you have to go?" When Tabata told her it
was still a long time, she held back tears and told him to "keep up the good
work." The Family Day allowed the team to show their family what they were
working so hard on. They set up stations for the kids to play the game all
around the office. This gave the team a new appreciation for what they were
creating and restored morale to get them to the end of the road.

Tabata ended his talk on a positive note, showing the team
had surpassed the 6 million mark in sales, which was initially seen as a high
goal when he set it. He said he's learned to turn challenges into
opportunities, even when unpredictable problems occur, such as people leaking
spoilers of the game before release.  He
then fired back at those who were leaking things by integrating that into the
marketing. He said when all is said and done, he considers Final Fantasy XV a
success and "the series will probably live on."

He ended his talk saying the team is looking to improve even
more on Final Fantasy XV, improving destruction, A.I. and procedural elements.
He then discussed having more monster battles where the A.I. analyze players'
patterns and adapting to it better as a new goal.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

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