Master of The Free World Productions | Jumpcut Entertainment Network

The Evolution Of Chloe’s Design For Uncharted: The Lost Legacy

It’s been a while since we’ve seen seen the headstrong Chloe Frazer in action. The last time we saw her was in Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception, which launched over five years ago. Since then a lot has changed in Chloe’s life. She’s moved up in the treasure-hunting business, taking on bigger jobs with higher risks. In the standalone expansion, Uncharted: The Lost Legacy, she tackles her biggest project yet, searching India for the highly valuable Tusk of Ganesh. Naughty Dog had to reimagine Chloe for The Lost Legacy just like they did with Nathan Drake in Uncharted 4, taking into account the passage of time and showing the maturity of the character. While we visited Naughty Dog for our recent cover story, the artists and animators spoke to us about what went into Chloe’s redesign. 

For Uncharted 4, Naughty Dog’s graphics engine took the biggest overhaul, making everything look more realistic than before. The team was tasked with bringing Chloe’s design up to the standard of what was set with Uncharted 4. She was finally the lead, requiring more attention devoted to her than ever before. Since Chloe is a legacy character, who fans already have an attachment to, the design team felt extra pressure to get her just right. Chloe had to age, but she also needed to remain familiar to fans. As such, she has her iconic ponytail, but also minor signs of aging, such as crow’s feet. 

Click on image above for full size. 

“This is a character that everyone fell in love with in Uncharted 2,” says concept artist Richard Lyons. “[We asked], ‘How do we keep all those elements familiar, but bring it into a space which is more suitable for where we want our games to be?’ And we were terrified that no one was going to recognize her at the PSX demo. We were looking at so many different things, such as facial features and getting the ponytail right…even where the part [in her hair] was.” Thankfully, the audience recognized Chloe and cheered when they saw her entire face. According to Lyons, fans came up to the team afterward, saying her smokey eye makeup was a dead giveaway. 

Chloe still dresses similarly, wearing jeans and earth colors, but one thing she’s abandoned is her crop top. “We’re just trying to basically marry that relationship of Uncharted 2, which everyone goes back to, but it’s more in materials, colors, and thematic kind of traits rather than, ‘Does she have to have a crop top?’” Lyons says. The team all agreed in the eight years since Uncharted 2, Chloe’s fashion sense would have changed a bit. “You try to put yourself in her mind and think, ‘What would she be wearing now?,” Lyons says. The team made sure to keep certain standbys, right down to her pistol preference and the amount of jewelry she wears. 

In addition to up-resing the character model, all the tech upgrades from Uncharted 4 needed to be applied to Chloe, including minute details such as how sweat and dirt look on her. Animations for Chloe also had to be considered; she wouldn’t move like Nathan Drake. Chloe is shorter than Drake, so she doesn’t have the reach he does, but she also has a more elegant climbing style. Similarly, her melee combat skills are more graceful than Drake, who spent most of his time throwing haymakers. Chloe is not trained in martial arts, but because of her slight frame, she uses her knees, legs, and momentum to take down foes. 

Chloe’s appearance has certainly evolved, but so has her story in The Lost Legacy. This is Naughty Dog’s first chance to really dive into her backstory and explore why Chloe is a self-preservationist. The soul-searching journey should bring us into new territory with the character when it launches later this year on PlayStation 4. 

Click on the banner below to enter our hub of exclusive content that we'll be updating throughout the month.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

The Evolution Of Chloe’s Design For Uncharted: The Lost Legacy

It’s been a while since we’ve seen seen the headstrong Chloe Frazer in action. The last time we saw her was in Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception, which launched over five years ago. Since then a lot has changed in Chloe’s life. She’s moved up in the treasure-hunting business, taking on bigger jobs with higher risks. In the standalone expansion, Uncharted: The Lost Legacy, she tackles her biggest project yet, searching India for the highly valuable Tusk of Ganesh. Naughty Dog had to reimagine Chloe for The Lost Legacy just like they did with Nathan Drake in Uncharted 4, taking into account the passage of time and showing the maturity of the character. While we visited Naughty Dog for our recent cover story, the artists and animators spoke to us about what went into Chloe’s redesign. 

For Uncharted 4, Naughty Dog’s graphics engine took the biggest overhaul, making everything look more realistic than before. The team was tasked with bringing Chloe’s design up to the standard of what was set with Uncharted 4. She was finally the lead, requiring more attention devoted to her than ever before. Since Chloe is a legacy character, who fans already have an attachment to, the design team felt extra pressure to get her just right. Chloe had to age, but she also needed to remain familiar to fans. As such, she has her iconic ponytail, but also minor signs of aging, such as crow’s feet. 

Click on image above for full size. 

“This is a character that everyone fell in love with in Uncharted 2,” says concept artist Richard Lyons. “[We asked], ‘How do we keep all those elements familiar, but bring it into a space which is more suitable for where we want our games to be?’ And we were terrified that no one was going to recognize her at the PSX demo. We were looking at so many different things, such as facial features and getting the ponytail right…even where the part [in her hair] was.” Thankfully, the audience recognized Chloe and cheered when they saw her entire face. According to Lyons, fans came up to the team afterward, saying her smokey eye makeup was a dead giveaway. 

Chloe still dresses similarly, wearing jeans and earth colors, but one thing she’s abandoned is her crop top. “We’re just trying to basically marry that relationship of Uncharted 2, which everyone goes back to, but it’s more in materials, colors, and thematic kind of traits rather than, ‘Does she have to have a crop top?’” Lyons says. The team all agreed in the eight years since Uncharted 2, Chloe’s fashion sense would have changed a bit. “You try to put yourself in her mind and think, ‘What would she be wearing now?,” Lyons says. The team made sure to keep certain standbys, right down to her pistol preference and the amount of jewelry she wears. 

In addition to up-resing the character model, all the tech upgrades from Uncharted 4 needed to be applied to Chloe, including minute details such as how sweat and dirt look on her. Animations for Chloe also had to be considered; she wouldn’t move like Nathan Drake. Chloe is shorter than Drake, so she doesn’t have the reach he does, but she also has a more elegant climbing style. Similarly, her melee combat skills are more graceful than Drake, who spent most of his time throwing haymakers. Chloe is not trained in martial arts, but because of her slight frame, she uses her knees, legs, and momentum to take down foes. 

Chloe’s appearance has certainly evolved, but so has her story in The Lost Legacy. This is Naughty Dog’s first chance to really dive into her backstory and explore why Chloe is a self-preservationist. The soul-searching journey should bring us into new territory with the character when it launches later this year on PlayStation 4. 

Click on the banner below to enter our hub of exclusive content that we'll be updating throughout the month.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Charting the game design evolution of The Witcher trilogy

“I’m not talking about simplifying things. I’m talking about smart introductions and flawless immersion. That’s what we are very much after in games.” …


Gamasutra News

Your 2017 Guide To Pokémon Go Eggs, Evolution Items, And More

Pokémon Go captured the world when it launched in summer 2016.
Beyond the excitement of traveling to new locations to catch monsters and meet
like-minded trainers, one of the things that made Niantic's collaboration with
The Pokémon Company so interesting was the mystery that surrounded nearly every
element about the game.

The mystery was thrilling at first, but after a while, being
in the dark wore on users of the app, and they decided to do something about
it. Players scoured their local areas, data-mined the app, and started
crowd-sourced sites on where to find the best monsters and how to be the most
efficient trainers they could be.

Each time a new major update hits, the sense of mystery in
Pokémon Go is reinvigorated. However, thanks to the methods discovered and
created by players in the original release, light is shed on each successive
update quicker than ever before.

Check out the latest information on Pokémon Go below, and if
you have anything you think would be helpful to add, let us know in the
comments section.

People Still Play
Pokémon Go?

Yes. Lots. As recently as February 22, 2017, it was the
top-grossing app in the iOS App Store. Alright, now that we have that out of
the way…

Well, I've never
played it. How do I start and what should I focus on at first?

Well, all you need to do is download it on the iOS App Store
or the Google Play store. It's a free app with optional microtransactions. Once
you're in, you'll be asked to choose a starter Pokémon. You can choose between
Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle, or do a secret trick to get Pikachu as your
starter
.

Once you're up and running, simply walk around
and start catching things that you encounter and spinning the disks of each
PokéStop you stumble upon to earn items. Each new monster brings you one step
closer to filling up your Pokédex, which is for many, the ultimate goal of the
game. Each time you catch a Pokémon, you earn candies, which can be used to
evolve some Pokémon or, when combined with stardust, power them up. I'd
recommend holding off on powering up any Pokémon until you get to a higher
level, as each time you level up your profile, you are able to catch more
powerful monsters. Until then, just save up your candies not used for evolution
and stockpile any stardust – you'll love having an abundance of stardust later
on when your monsters are ready to take on gyms. For more on gym battles, head
here

Where Can I Find A
Specific Pokémon?

Due to the nature of Pokémon Go's spawns, there is
unfortunately no reliable way to tell you to go to a specific spot to always
catch a specific Pokémon. However, many monsters do "nest" in the game, meaning
that if you go to a particular spot while their nest is located there, you're
likely to catch several of that monster.

Nests are not mentioned in Pokémon Go itself, but you can
find out what nests are around you (and even search on specific species of
Pokémon) using The Silph Road's Nest Atlas tool. This tool features reliable
crowd-sourced information from Pokémon Go players all over the world who report
the nests they encounter.

If you find an accessible nest of a creature
that you need, it's not a good idea to wait. Nests migrate approximately every
two weeks, which means many of the nests near you will be replaced by another
creature. The silver lining is that the Weedle nest next to your house could
very well become a Kabuto nest for a couple of weeks. 

What Pokémon Are
Region-Exclusive?

Just like in the mainline Pokémon games, some monsters can
only be found in certain regions. Check out the full list of known regional
exclusives below.

  • Tauros – North America
  • Farfetch'd – Asia
  • Mr. Mime – Europe
  • Kangaskhan – Australia
  • Heracross – Central and South America, Southern
    Florida and Texas
  • Corsola – Tropical Regions (Appears to be within
    30 degrees of the equator)

[Source:
Reddit]

What Do I Get From
Eggs?

If you can't find a particular Pokémon, sometimes the best
way to find it is to leave it up to the roulette that is hatching eggs. You get
eggs from PokéStops and can hold up to nine at a time. In order to hatch eggs,
you must equip an incubator and walk the distance required for the type of egg
it is.

Each trainer is provided one incubator that can be used an
infinite amount of time. Additional incubators can be earned through leveling
up (though that becomes much rarer at higher levels), but the easiest way to
get more incubators is to buy them for 150 Pokécoins each in Pokémon Go's
in-app shop. Unfortunately, every incubator earned or purchased outside of the
original one can only be used to hatch three eggs.

A popular strategy is to use limited-use incubators on 5km
and 10km eggs, while only using the unlimited-use incubator every trainer has
on the multitude of 2km eggs you're sure to encounter. This will ensure you
don't burn through your premium incubators on eggs that not only hatch quickly,
but are also less likely to yield anything good. In addition, the higher the
egg distance, the more candy you'll receive for the Pokémon that hatches.

These eggs look different based on how far you must walk to
hatch them. 2km eggs are colored with green spots, 5km eggs feature yellow
spots, while 10km eggs have blue spots. While it might sound like you'd only
want 2km eggs so that you can burn through them and gather as many Pokémon as
quickly as possible, the higher the distance required by the egg, the better
the pool of Pokémon is that can hatch from it.

You cannot acquire regional exclusive Pokémon from eggs not
found in those regions, and stats have shown that if you visit the same PokéStops
every day, you'll likely hatch the same handful of Pokémon each time. In
addition, only the most basic form of that Pokémon's evolution chain is able to
be hatched, meaning you'll never find a Charizard or Dragonite in your eggs,
but rather those Pokémon's pre-evolution forms, Charmander and Dratini.

To see what species of Pokémon come from each egg type,
check out the most recent list below.

2km Eggs

  • Bulbasaur
  • Caterpie
  • Ekans
  • Zubat
  • Diglett
  • Bellsprout
  • Gastly
  • Goldeen
  • Igglybuff
  • Chikorita
  • Pichu
  • Togepi
  • Charmander
  • Weedle
  • Nidoran (M)
  • Oddish
  • Abra
  • Geodude
  • Krabby
  • Magikarp
  • Aipom
  • Cyndaquil
  • Remoraid
  • Squirtle
  • Spearow
  • Nidoran (F)
  • Venonat
  • Machop
  • Slowpoke
  • Exeggcute
  • Cleffa
  • Misdreavus
  • Totodile
  • Slugma

5km Eggs

  • Sandshrew
  • Meowth
  • Growlithe
  • Ponyta
  • Seel
  • Onix
  • Cubone
  • Rhyhorn
  • Staryu
  • Eevee
  • Kabuto
  • Yanma
  • Magby
  • Shuckle
  • Tyrogue
  • Dunsparce
  • Vulpix
  • Psyduck
  • Poliwag
  • Magnemite
  • Grimer
  • Drowzee
  • Lickitung
  • Tangela
  • Scyther
  • Porygon
  • Elekid
  • Girafarig
  • Phanpy
  • Smoochum
  • Wobbuffet
  • Regional Exclusives
  • Paras
  • Mankey
  • Tentacool
  • Doduo
  • Shellder
  • Voltorb
  • Koffing
  • Horsea
  • Pinsir
  • Omanyte
  • Sneasel
  • Natu
  • Qwilfish
  • Stantler
  • Wooper

10km Eggs

  • Chansey
  • Aerodactyl
  • Dratini
  • Miltank
  • Mantine
  • Pineco
  • Sudowoodo
  • Lapras
  • Snorlax
  • Gligar
  • Larvitar
  • Mareep
  • Skarmory

[Source: Pokémon Go Hub]

On the next page, we get into coins, Legendary Pokémon, Evolution Items, trading, and more!


www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Your 2017 Guide To Pokémon Go Eggs, Evolution Items, And More

Pokémon Go captured the world when it launched in summer 2016.
Beyond the excitement of traveling to new locations to catch monsters and meet
like-minded trainers, one of the things that made Niantic's collaboration with
The Pokémon Company so interesting was the mystery that surrounded nearly every
element about the game.

The mystery was thrilling at first, but after a while, being
in the dark wore on users of the app, and they decided to do something about
it. Players scoured their local areas, data-mined the app, and started
crowd-sourced sites on where to find the best monsters and how to be the most
efficient trainers they could be.

Each time a new major update hits, the sense of mystery in
Pokémon Go is reinvigorated. However, thanks to the methods discovered and
created by players in the original release, light is shed on each successive
update quicker than ever before.

Check out the latest information on Pokémon Go below, and if
you have anything you think would be helpful to add, let us know in the
comments section.

People Still Play
Pokémon Go?

Yes. Lots. As recently as February 22, 2017, it was the
top-grossing app in the iOS App Store. Alright, now that we have that out of
the way…

Well, I've never
played it. How do I start and what should I focus on at first?

Well, all you need to do is download it on the iOS App Store
or the Google Play store. It's a free app with optional microtransactions. Once
you're in, you'll be asked to choose a starter Pokémon. You can choose between
Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle, or do a secret trick to get Pikachu as your
starter
.

Once you're up and running, simply walk around
and start catching things that you encounter and spinning the disks of each
PokéStop you stumble upon to earn items. Each new monster brings you one step
closer to filling up your Pokédex, which is for many, the ultimate goal of the
game. Each time you catch a Pokémon, you earn candies, which can be used to
evolve some Pokémon or, when combined with stardust, power them up. I'd
recommend holding off on powering up any Pokémon until you get to a higher
level, as each time you level up your profile, you are able to catch more
powerful monsters. Until then, just save up your candies not used for evolution
and stockpile any stardust – you'll love having an abundance of stardust later
on when your monsters are ready to take on gyms. For more on gym battles, head
here

Where Can I Find A
Specific Pokémon?

Due to the nature of Pokémon Go's spawns, there is
unfortunately no reliable way to tell you to go to a specific spot to always
catch a specific Pokémon. However, many monsters do "nest" in the game, meaning
that if you go to a particular spot while their nest is located there, you're
likely to catch several of that monster.

Nests are not mentioned in Pokémon Go itself, but you can
find out what nests are around you (and even search on specific species of
Pokémon) using The Silph Road's Nest Atlas tool. This tool features reliable
crowd-sourced information from Pokémon Go players all over the world who report
the nests they encounter.

If you find an accessible nest of a creature
that you need, it's not a good idea to wait. Nests migrate approximately every
two weeks, which means many of the nests near you will be replaced by another
creature. The silver lining is that the Weedle nest next to your house could
very well become a Kabuto nest for a couple of weeks. 

What Pokémon Are
Region-Exclusive?

Just like in the mainline Pokémon games, some monsters can
only be found in certain regions. Check out the full list of known regional
exclusives below.

  • Tauros – North America
  • Farfetch'd – Asia
  • Mr. Mime – Europe
  • Kangaskhan – Australia
  • Heracross – Central and South America, Southern
    Florida and Texas
  • Corsola – Tropical Regions (Appears to be within
    30 degrees of the equator)

[Source:
Reddit]

What Do I Get From
Eggs?

If you can't find a particular Pokémon, sometimes the best
way to find it is to leave it up to the roulette that is hatching eggs. You get
eggs from PokéStops and can hold up to nine at a time. In order to hatch eggs,
you must equip an incubator and walk the distance required for the type of egg
it is.

Each trainer is provided one incubator that can be used an
infinite amount of time. Additional incubators can be earned through leveling
up (though that becomes much rarer at higher levels), but the easiest way to
get more incubators is to buy them for 150 Pokécoins each in Pokémon Go's
in-app shop. Unfortunately, every incubator earned or purchased outside of the
original one can only be used to hatch three eggs.

A popular strategy is to use limited-use incubators on 5km
and 10km eggs, while only using the unlimited-use incubator every trainer has
on the multitude of 2km eggs you're sure to encounter. This will ensure you
don't burn through your premium incubators on eggs that not only hatch quickly,
but are also less likely to yield anything good. In addition, the higher the
egg distance, the more candy you'll receive for the Pokémon that hatches.

These eggs look different based on how far you must walk to
hatch them. 2km eggs are colored with green spots, 5km eggs feature yellow
spots, while 10km eggs have blue spots. While it might sound like you'd only
want 2km eggs so that you can burn through them and gather as many Pokémon as
quickly as possible, the higher the distance required by the egg, the better
the pool of Pokémon is that can hatch from it.

You cannot acquire regional exclusive Pokémon from eggs not
found in those regions, and stats have shown that if you visit the same PokéStops
every day, you'll likely hatch the same handful of Pokémon each time. In
addition, only the most basic form of that Pokémon's evolution chain is able to
be hatched, meaning you'll never find a Charizard or Dragonite in your eggs,
but rather those Pokémon's pre-evolution forms, Charmander and Dratini.

To see what species of Pokémon come from each egg type,
check out the most recent list below.

2km Eggs

  • Bulbasaur
  • Caterpie
  • Ekans
  • Zubat
  • Diglett
  • Bellsprout
  • Gastly
  • Goldeen
  • Igglybuff
  • Chikorita
  • Pichu
  • Togepi
  • Charmander
  • Weedle
  • Nidoran (M)
  • Oddish
  • Abra
  • Geodude
  • Krabby
  • Magikarp
  • Aipom
  • Cyndaquil
  • Remoraid
  • Squirtle
  • Spearow
  • Nidoran (F)
  • Venonat
  • Machop
  • Slowpoke
  • Exeggcute
  • Cleffa
  • Misdreavus
  • Totodile
  • Slugma

5km Eggs

  • Sandshrew
  • Meowth
  • Growlithe
  • Ponyta
  • Seel
  • Onix
  • Cubone
  • Rhyhorn
  • Staryu
  • Eevee
  • Kabuto
  • Yanma
  • Magby
  • Shuckle
  • Tyrogue
  • Dunsparce
  • Vulpix
  • Psyduck
  • Poliwag
  • Magnemite
  • Grimer
  • Drowzee
  • Lickitung
  • Tangela
  • Scyther
  • Porygon
  • Elekid
  • Girafarig
  • Phanpy
  • Smoochum
  • Wobbuffet
  • Regional Exclusives
  • Paras
  • Mankey
  • Tentacool
  • Doduo
  • Shellder
  • Voltorb
  • Koffing
  • Horsea
  • Pinsir
  • Omanyte
  • Sneasel
  • Natu
  • Qwilfish
  • Stantler
  • Wooper

10km Eggs

  • Chansey
  • Aerodactyl
  • Dratini
  • Miltank
  • Mantine
  • Pineco
  • Sudowoodo
  • Lapras
  • Snorlax
  • Gligar
  • Larvitar
  • Mareep
  • Skarmory

[Source: Pokémon Go Hub]

On the next page, we get into coins, Legendary Pokémon, Evolution Items, trading, and more!


www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Your 2017 Guide To Pokémon Go Eggs, Evolution Items, And More

Pokémon Go captured the world when it launched in summer 2016.
Beyond the excitement of traveling to new locations to catch monsters and meet
like-minded trainers, one of the things that made Niantic's collaboration with
The Pokémon Company so interesting was the mystery that surrounded nearly every
element about the game.

The mystery was thrilling at first, but after a while, being
in the dark wore on users of the app, and they decided to do something about
it. Players scoured their local areas, data-mined the app, and started
crowd-sourced sites on where to find the best monsters and how to be the most
efficient trainers they could be.

Each time a new major update hits, the sense of mystery in
Pokémon Go is reinvigorated. However, thanks to the methods discovered and
created by players in the original release, light is shed on each successive
update quicker than ever before.

Check out the latest information on Pokémon Go below, and if
you have anything you think would be helpful to add, let us know in the
comments section.

People Still Play
Pokémon Go?

Yes. Lots. As recently as February 22, 2017, it was the
top-grossing app in the iOS App Store. Alright, now that we have that out of
the way…

Well, I've never
played it. How do I start and what should I focus on at first?

Well, all you need to do is download it on the iOS App Store
or the Google Play store. It's a free app with optional microtransactions. Once
you're in, you'll be asked to choose a starter Pokémon. You can choose between
Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle, or do a secret trick to get Pikachu as your
starter
.

Once you're up and running, simply walk around
and start catching things that you encounter and spinning the disks of each
PokéStop you stumble upon to earn items. Each new monster brings you one step
closer to filling up your Pokédex, which is for many, the ultimate goal of the
game. Each time you catch a Pokémon, you earn candies, which can be used to
evolve some Pokémon or, when combined with stardust, power them up. I'd
recommend holding off on powering up any Pokémon until you get to a higher
level, as each time you level up your profile, you are able to catch more
powerful monsters. Until then, just save up your candies not used for evolution
and stockpile any stardust – you'll love having an abundance of stardust later
on when your monsters are ready to take on gyms. For more on gym battles, head
here

Where Can I Find A
Specific Pokémon?

Due to the nature of Pokémon Go's spawns, there is
unfortunately no reliable way to tell you to go to a specific spot to always
catch a specific Pokémon. However, many monsters do "nest" in the game, meaning
that if you go to a particular spot while their nest is located there, you're
likely to catch several of that monster.

Nests are not mentioned in Pokémon Go itself, but you can
find out what nests are around you (and even search on specific species of
Pokémon) using The Silph Road's Nest Atlas tool. This tool features reliable
crowd-sourced information from Pokémon Go players all over the world who report
the nests they encounter.

If you find an accessible nest of a creature
that you need, it's not a good idea to wait. Nests migrate approximately every
two weeks, which means many of the nests near you will be replaced by another
creature. The silver lining is that the Weedle nest next to your house could
very well become a Kabuto nest for a couple of weeks. 

What Pokémon Are
Region-Exclusive?

Just like in the mainline Pokémon games, some monsters can
only be found in certain regions. Check out the full list of known regional
exclusives below.

  • Tauros – North America
  • Farfetch'd – Asia
  • Mr. Mime – Europe
  • Kangaskhan – Australia
  • Heracross – Central and South America, Southern
    Florida and Texas
  • Corsola – Tropical Regions (Appears to be within
    30 degrees of the equator)

[Source:
Reddit]

What Do I Get From
Eggs?

If you can't find a particular Pokémon, sometimes the best
way to find it is to leave it up to the roulette that is hatching eggs. You get
eggs from PokéStops and can hold up to nine at a time. In order to hatch eggs,
you must equip an incubator and walk the distance required for the type of egg
it is.

Each trainer is provided one incubator that can be used an
infinite amount of time. Additional incubators can be earned through leveling
up (though that becomes much rarer at higher levels), but the easiest way to
get more incubators is to buy them for 150 Pokécoins each in Pokémon Go's
in-app shop. Unfortunately, every incubator earned or purchased outside of the
original one can only be used to hatch three eggs.

A popular strategy is to use limited-use incubators on 5km
and 10km eggs, while only using the unlimited-use incubator every trainer has
on the multitude of 2km eggs you're sure to encounter. This will ensure you
don't burn through your premium incubators on eggs that not only hatch quickly,
but are also less likely to yield anything good. In addition, the higher the
egg distance, the more candy you'll receive for the Pokémon that hatches.

These eggs look different based on how far you must walk to
hatch them. 2km eggs are colored with green spots, 5km eggs feature yellow
spots, while 10km eggs have blue spots. While it might sound like you'd only
want 2km eggs so that you can burn through them and gather as many Pokémon as
quickly as possible, the higher the distance required by the egg, the better
the pool of Pokémon is that can hatch from it.

You cannot acquire regional exclusive Pokémon from eggs not
found in those regions, and stats have shown that if you visit the same PokéStops
every day, you'll likely hatch the same handful of Pokémon each time. In
addition, only the most basic form of that Pokémon's evolution chain is able to
be hatched, meaning you'll never find a Charizard or Dragonite in your eggs,
but rather those Pokémon's pre-evolution forms, Charmander and Dratini.

To see what species of Pokémon come from each egg type,
check out the most recent list below.

2km Eggs

  • Bulbasaur
  • Caterpie
  • Ekans
  • Zubat
  • Diglett
  • Bellsprout
  • Gastly
  • Goldeen
  • Igglybuff
  • Chikorita
  • Pichu
  • Togepi
  • Charmander
  • Weedle
  • Nidoran (M)
  • Oddish
  • Abra
  • Geodude
  • Krabby
  • Magikarp
  • Aipom
  • Cyndaquil
  • Remoraid
  • Squirtle
  • Spearow
  • Nidoran (F)
  • Venonat
  • Machop
  • Slowpoke
  • Exeggcute
  • Cleffa
  • Misdreavus
  • Totodile
  • Slugma

5km Eggs

  • Sandshrew
  • Meowth
  • Growlithe
  • Ponyta
  • Seel
  • Onix
  • Cubone
  • Rhyhorn
  • Staryu
  • Eevee
  • Kabuto
  • Yanma
  • Magby
  • Shuckle
  • Tyrogue
  • Dunsparce
  • Vulpix
  • Psyduck
  • Poliwag
  • Magnemite
  • Grimer
  • Drowzee
  • Lickitung
  • Tangela
  • Scyther
  • Porygon
  • Elekid
  • Girafarig
  • Phanpy
  • Smoochum
  • Wobbuffet
  • Regional Exclusives
  • Paras
  • Mankey
  • Tentacool
  • Doduo
  • Shellder
  • Voltorb
  • Koffing
  • Horsea
  • Pinsir
  • Omanyte
  • Sneasel
  • Natu
  • Qwilfish
  • Stantler
  • Wooper

10km Eggs

  • Chansey
  • Aerodactyl
  • Dratini
  • Miltank
  • Mantine
  • Pineco
  • Sudowoodo
  • Lapras
  • Snorlax
  • Gligar
  • Larvitar
  • Mareep
  • Skarmory

[Source: Pokémon Go Hub]

On the next page, we get into coins, Legendary Pokémon, Evolution Items, trading, and more!


www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Pro Evolution Soccer 2017 Gets A Free-To-Play Trial Edition

Pro Evolution Soccer 2017 has been available for a little over two months. If you've been holding off on giving it a shot, today is your lucky day.

Titled PES2017 Trial Edition, this version of the game is described as the, “free-to-play version” in its description, but it also functions as a demo. The number of playable teams is limited and Master League won't be available, but you will be able to train, play PES League, as well as exhibition matches.

You can download the game on PlayStation 4, head here. You can find the Xbox One version here. For our review of Pro Evolution Soccer 2017, head here.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Tracing the evolution of game writing, from System Shock to Tacoma

“‘We have no idea how to do a believable conversation in a game,’” recalls System Shock dev Warren Spector. “That was when the decision was made to kill everybody on Citadel Station.” …


Gamasutra News

The Sports Desk – The Pro Evolution Soccer 2017 Afterwords

Pro Evolution Soccer 2017 is the best iteration of the series to date (click for my review), including captivating gameplay and a full suite of modes, features, and licenses. We had a chance to chat with Andre Bronzoni, the PES brand manager for the Americas about the title, the decisions made during development, and where it may be going after its release.

You announced plans for the first two free updates. Are you fulfilling your update schedule as you originally planned before launch? Have you also been able to make the bug fixes and changes you like with this schedule?
Yes, when we originally planned our data pack schedule we anticipated for improvements and things to fix according to the feedback we received during launch. We're also leveraging our monthly server maintenance to improve things in the game.

You have made fixes to address online stability problems. Currently, is the online as stable as you want it to be?
It's stable and currently running well according to the latest feedback from our fans, but there's still room for improvements in order to run the way we want it to.

For 2017, Liverpool and Borussia Dortmund are among your highlighted licenses. Are these multi-year deals? PES 2016 featured a Manchester United license, but that has expired for 2017. In general, in your opinion are licenses that are only in the game for a limited time or for a year valuable?
We can't discuss details into our licenses, but I can tell you we've had Manchester United for the past eight years (PES 2009-PES 2016), while some of our licensing deals have been on a year-to-year basis. We're constantly evaluating what partnerships work best for the game and ultimately for our fans, and player feedback is something that drives much of the decision. We're changing the way we do things, and our first big step has been our premium partnership with FC Barcelona and our deals with Borussia Dortmund and Liverpool, alongside deals in South America.

Has Konami's overall reduction of console titles affected the franchise and/or PES Productions as a developer?
Personally, I think it has temporarily shifted the focus and the spotlight to PES. As you can see in this year's release, we are starting to fulfill more and more of our fans' expectations. PES 2017 is one of the best titles the series has seen yet, and we're excited about its reception by fans.

Could a future update for the game address the lack of A.I. teams signing players in Master League and/or address the high amounts of money the A.I. pays for old players?
We spend a lot of time listening to the feedback and surveys from our fans and consumers, as we try to improve and fix those areas in the game. I can't tell you if that will be an update at this time, but we're considering all feedback.

Now that the game's been out for a while and you've gotten user data, what modes are people spending most of their time with? Any surprises?
No big surprises here. As you probably suspect, people are spending their time on myClub, Online Divisions, and Master League.

In MyClub, can you explain why users can't sell their scouts in the Auction House?
For PES 2016, the feedback we received was the ability to acquire the players you want or even players to fill a specific position. Therefore, we created the scout auction house to meet those demands. We still haven't decided on the transfer market for players or scouts, which is why you haven't seen those implemented in the game just yet.

Some of the series' presentation elements (commentary, menu design) have been the same the past few years. Is this a part of the game fans can expect to be updated in the future?
I can't share much about what elements we are currently working on for the future of PES as we don't want to spoil any surprises, but yes, those are some of the things we know our fans expect us to improve in the future. 

Can you explain why option files aren't available for Xbox systems and what it would take to possibly change the situation?
Using Sony's USB import-export options has been an easier process for us. The situation is a little different with Microsoft, but we're working with them on trying to address that.

How long do you intend to release PES titles for the last generation of hardware?
Many of our fans, especially in Central and South America, are still playing on PS3 and Xbox 360 so we can't let them down. PES 2017 was the number-one downloaded game on PS3 last September according to Sony, so we plan to support last generation as long as it makes sense.

Missed some of the previous Sports Desk entries? Take a look at the past installments via our Hub page by clicking on the banner below.

Have a suggestion or comment? Put it in the comments section below, send me an email, or reach me on twitter at @mattkato.

 

 

RELEASE LIST

Franchise Hockey Manager 3 (PC, Mac) October
Football Manager 17 (PC, Mac, Linux) November 4
Motorsport Manager (PC, Mac) November 10 (check out more about the game in this previous Sports Desk)
Steep (PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PC) December 2

 

 

THE TICKER
A quick rundown of some of the sports news from the week.

Ken Griffey Jr. Makes The Cover Of MLB Show 17
For information on the game's various special editions, click here.

Predicting The Season With NBA 2K17

NBA 2K17's First Patch Coming; Enables Roster Updates

The Infinite Air Launch Trailer

Ubisoft Announces the Steep Open Beta 

Sega Announces Deal to Make Games For Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Don’t Miss: Alien: Isolation and the evolution of horror simulators

Amnesia and Soma developer Thomas Grip recounts the history of games that invoke terror in players and how Alien: Isolation successfully captured the spirit of a ‘horror simulator’ game. …


Gamasutra News