Master of The Free World Productions | Jumpcut Entertainment Network

Capcom Announces Steam Release Date For Dead Rising 4

Released in December of last year, the PC version of Dead Rising 4 was originally a timed exclusive for the Windows 10 Store. Now that Microsoft's 90-day exclusivity period is nearly up, the zombie beat-'em-up will soon be available on Steam.

Starting today, Steam users can pre-order Dead Rising 4 before its release on March 14th. The game's announcement trailer promises more of the bloody, over-the-top action and tongue-in-cheek humor that fans of the series have come to expect. Check out the trailer below for the official announcement (PC players should note Frank's take on "robust monitor support").

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Check out our review of Dead Rising 4 for a closer look at Frank's shenanigans.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Capcom Announces Steam Release Date For Dead Rising 4

Released in December of last year, the PC version of Dead Rising 4 was originally a timed exclusive for the Windows 10 Store. Now that Microsoft's 90-day exclusivity period is nearly up, the zombie beat-'em-up will soon be available on Steam.

Starting today, Steam users can pre-order Dead Rising 4 before its release on March 14th. The game's announcement trailer promises more of the bloody, over-the-top action and tongue-in-cheek humor that fans of the series have come to expect. Check out the trailer below for the official announcement (PC players should note Frank's take on "robust monitor support").

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Check out our review of Dead Rising 4 for a closer look at Frank's shenanigans.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

The Walking Dead: A New Frontier Ep. 3 Release & Season Retail Box Announced

Telltale has announced the release month for the third episode of the adventure series' third season – dubbed Above the Law. If you haven't played the first two episodes, you can also catch up with a retail box version of the season in February.

Above the Law comes out in March, and before then on February 28 you can purchase the retail box version of The Walking Dead: A New Frontier with the first two episodes of the current season, as well as the promise of all the future episodes for the five-episode season when they come out (via download).

[Source: Telltale Games]

 

Our Take
If you've been holding off on the season three, I highly suggest you dive in, as it's been great so far. 

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

What GTA Online May Tell Us About Red Dead Redemption 2

Several months removed from a short teaser trailer and a concise statement from Rockstar saying Red Dead Redemption 2 is “an epic tale of life in America’s unforgiving heartland,” we still have no concrete details about the game other than the fragments we salvaged from the early footage. As we wait for Rockstar to share more about its highly anticipated sequel, we can’t help but wonder what lessons the company learned from the hugely successful Grand Theft Auto Online that could be applied to the “brand new online multiplayer experience” coming in the developer’s return to the Wild West. 

We should preface this thought exercise by saying two things. First, Rockstar isn’t a developer content to rest on its laurels. As its crown jewel franchise, Grand Theft Auto, has demonstrated in the 16 years since its inception, Rockstar tirelessly strives to redefine the open-world experience. The series has grown from a top-down perspective with text dialogue and arcade shooting sounds to a sprawling masterpiece of modern 3D game design featuring Hollywood quality voice acting, an amazing curated soundtrack, strong shooting and driving mechanics, a living open world, and the most ambitious and successful take on open-world multiplayer ever seen. Spending the last several years building out GTA Online has proven wise, as the mode has already generated more than $ 500 million in revenue and it keeps growing. This past December was the mode’s busiest month yet. We hardly expect Red Dead Redemption 2 to simply take the foundation of Grand Theft Auto Online and retrofit it into a Western setting, but it provides a good starting point. 

Second, the potential game features outlined below are pure speculation from a Rockstar fan whose imagination is running wild with possibilities. I have no insider information about what features are coming to Red Dead Redemption 2. Rather, I’ve taken what we know about the basic structure of Grand Theft Auto Online to hypothesize how the various parts would work as jumping off point for Rockstar’s next leap forward. 

(Please visit the site to view this media)

WESTWARD EXPANSION

Grand Theft Auto Online is undoubtedly the best online offering Rockstar has ever designed, but you can see traces of its foundation in the original Red Dead Redemption. 

The hit Western coupled its stellar campaign with an open-world multiplayer mode that expanded upon GTA IV’s early efforts, dropping you into the “free roam” game lobby with other players and letting you go anywhere in the open world. You could roll solo or group into a posse to hunt wildlife, attack enemy hideouts, or simply enjoy the breathtaking vistas. Those who preferred specific competitive experiences could forgo the open world in favor of a Rockstar-curated playlist of multiplayer modes like Gang Shootout (team deathmath), or Hold Your Own (capture the flag). 

Grand Theft Auto Online built upon this foundation by adding shops for deep player customization, purchasable assets like vehicles and properties, cooperative heists, character-driven missions and events, side activities, and even player-controlled criminal syndicates. Those illicit organizations and motorcycle clubs give players the means to conduct a variety of nefarious activates like drug running, car theft, counterfeit currency, assassinations, etc. right in the open world. 

You could draw a straight line to apply many of GTA Online’s features directly to a Western setting. It’s not hard to imagine general stores and trading outposts that allow players to buy new clothing, weapons, and supplies. Trains, boats, and horseback were the predominant methods of transportation in the late 1800s, so you likely wouldn’t have anything near the breadth of variety that GTA Online offers for vehicles. That said, Rockstar could increase the number of offerings with different horse breeds, wagons, and stagecoaches for players to use for land transportation, and allow players to purchase a variety of boats for traversing rivers. Steamboats were still going in the late 1800s, and could possibly serve as an analog to GTA Online’s yachts. 

Given the abundance of natural resources in the American heartland, we wouldn’t be surprised to see crafting and trading become a more integral part of the open-world experience in Red Dead Redemption 2. One of the primary complaints we hear about Grand Theft Auto Online players is how much grinding they must do to earn enough money to buy new items, set up organizations or motorcycle clubs, acquire luxury yachts, etc. These aspirational options largely serve as end-game content for the hardest of hardcore players. But introducing crafting could be an organic way for Rockstar to give players an alternate path to improving their lot rather than grinding repetitious multiplayer matches. 

The almighty dollar still drove commerce in the Wild West, but many during the expansion era got by on trading furs, wood, oil, and other resources. Integrating these into the game could give rise to many different types of legit organizations players could form or join like you see in larger MMOs. Do you like hunting? Start a fur trading outfit. Prefer to explore the vast American landscape? Maybe you should become a prospector looking to strike it rich with a gold, oil, or other precious materials discovery? Hell, Rockstar could even integrate a farming system. This hunter/gatherer/harvester dynamic wouldn’t be out of place in, either; Red Dead Redemption featured many quiet moments on farms and in forests that served as nice contrasts to the duels, hijackings, and mass murder.

THE CULTURE OF VIOLENCE

It wouldn’t be a Rockstar open-world game without the more unsavory element of society, and the Wild West setting is rich with opportunities. Robberies, kidnappings, and duels all slide naturally into this open-world setting. Many of the criminal activities of the era would also fit nicely into the Organization structure Rockstar introduced in Grand Theft Auto Online. Criminal gangs could trade in their usual stock, like gun running, drugs, prostitution, and counterfeit currency (or fool’s gold). Organizations of deputized regulators could stand in direct opposition. But that’s not the end to the kinds of factions that fit into the fiction. Rockstar could add groups influenced by real-world operations like the Pinkerton Agency, which straddled both sides of the law as it busted up union strikes, investigated murders, served as the security detail to high-profile persons of interest, and worked as private military contractors.  

The heist mechanics, which stressed planning and teamwork in GTA Online, would also carry over into Red Dead Redemption 2. Military forts entrenched deep in the wilderness, trains running supplies between towns, and big city banks are all ripe targets for aspiring criminals.

Looking at the trajectory of Rockstar’s open-world multiplayer ambitions, we expect Red Dead Redemption 2 to continue the meteoric growth. All the speculative ideas about how the progress made in Grand Theft Auto Online could serve as a jumping off point for another round of innovation excite us, and we’re curious to hear your thoughts. What features would you like to see implemented for our next online adventure in the Wild West? Share them in the comments below. 

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

What GTA Online May Tell Us About Red Dead Redemption 2

Several months removed from a short teaser trailer and a concise statement from Rockstar saying Red Dead Redemption 2 is “an epic tale of life in America’s unforgiving heartland,” we still have no concrete details about the game other than the fragments we salvaged from the early footage. As we wait for Rockstar to share more about its highly anticipated sequel, we can’t help but wonder what lessons the company learned from the hugely successful Grand Theft Auto Online that could be applied to the “brand new online multiplayer experience” coming in the developer’s return to the Wild West. 

We should preface this thought exercise by saying two things. First, Rockstar isn’t a developer content to rest on its laurels. As its crown jewel franchise, Grand Theft Auto, has demonstrated in the 16 years since its inception, Rockstar tirelessly strives to redefine the open-world experience. The series has grown from a top-down perspective with text dialogue and arcade shooting sounds to a sprawling masterpiece of modern 3D game design featuring Hollywood quality voice acting, an amazing curated soundtrack, strong shooting and driving mechanics, a living open world, and the most ambitious and successful take on open-world multiplayer ever seen. Spending the last several years building out GTA Online has proven wise, as the mode has already generated more than $ 500 million in revenue and it keeps growing. This past December was the mode’s busiest month yet. We hardly expect Red Dead Redemption 2 to simply take the foundation of Grand Theft Auto Online and retrofit it into a Western setting, but it provides a good starting point. 

Second, the potential game features outlined below are pure speculation from a Rockstar fan whose imagination is running wild with possibilities. I have no insider information about what features are coming to Red Dead Redemption 2. Rather, I’ve taken what we know about the basic structure of Grand Theft Auto Online to hypothesize how the various parts would work as jumping off point for Rockstar’s next leap forward. 

(Please visit the site to view this media)

WESTWARD EXPANSION

Grand Theft Auto Online is undoubtedly the best online offering Rockstar has ever designed, but you can see traces of its foundation in the original Red Dead Redemption. 

The hit Western coupled its stellar campaign with an open-world multiplayer mode that expanded upon GTA IV’s early efforts, dropping you into the “free roam” game lobby with other players and letting you go anywhere in the open world. You could roll solo or group into a posse to hunt wildlife, attack enemy hideouts, or simply enjoy the breathtaking vistas. Those who preferred specific competitive experiences could forgo the open world in favor of a Rockstar-curated playlist of multiplayer modes like Gang Shootout (team deathmath), or Hold Your Own (capture the flag). 

Grand Theft Auto Online built upon this foundation by adding shops for deep player customization, purchasable assets like vehicles and properties, cooperative heists, character-driven missions and events, side activities, and even player-controlled criminal syndicates. Those illicit organizations and motorcycle clubs give players the means to conduct a variety of nefarious activates like drug running, car theft, counterfeit currency, assassinations, etc. right in the open world. 

You could draw a straight line to apply many of GTA Online’s features directly to a Western setting. It’s not hard to imagine general stores and trading outposts that allow players to buy new clothing, weapons, and supplies. Trains, boats, and horseback were the predominant methods of transportation in the late 1800s, so you likely wouldn’t have anything near the breadth of variety that GTA Online offers for vehicles. That said, Rockstar could increase the number of offerings with different horse breeds, wagons, and stagecoaches for players to use for land transportation, and allow players to purchase a variety of boats for traversing rivers. Steamboats were still going in the late 1800s, and could possibly serve as an analog to GTA Online’s yachts. 

Given the abundance of natural resources in the American heartland, we wouldn’t be surprised to see crafting and trading become a more integral part of the open-world experience in Red Dead Redemption 2. One of the primary complaints we hear about Grand Theft Auto Online players is how much grinding they must do to earn enough money to buy new items, set up organizations or motorcycle clubs, acquire luxury yachts, etc. These aspirational options largely serve as end-game content for the hardest of hardcore players. But introducing crafting could be an organic way for Rockstar to give players an alternate path to improving their lot rather than grinding repetitious multiplayer matches. 

The almighty dollar still drove commerce in the Wild West, but many during the expansion era got by on trading furs, wood, oil, and other resources. Integrating these into the game could give rise to many different types of legit organizations players could form or join like you see in larger MMOs. Do you like hunting? Start a fur trading outfit. Prefer to explore the vast American landscape? Maybe you should become a prospector looking to strike it rich with a gold, oil, or other precious materials discovery? Hell, Rockstar could even integrate a farming system. This hunter/gatherer/harvester dynamic wouldn’t be out of place in, either; Red Dead Redemption featured many quiet moments on farms and in forests that served as nice contrasts to the duels, hijackings, and mass murder.

THE CULTURE OF VIOLENCE

It wouldn’t be a Rockstar open-world game without the more unsavory element of society, and the Wild West setting is rich with opportunities. Robberies, kidnappings, and duels all slide naturally into this open-world setting. Many of the criminal activities of the era would also fit nicely into the Organization structure Rockstar introduced in Grand Theft Auto Online. Criminal gangs could trade in their usual stock, like gun running, drugs, prostitution, and counterfeit currency (or fool’s gold). Organizations of deputized regulators could stand in direct opposition. But that’s not the end to the kinds of factions that fit into the fiction. Rockstar could add groups influenced by real-world operations like the Pinkerton Agency, which straddled both sides of the law as it busted up union strikes, investigated murders, served as the security detail to high-profile persons of interest, and worked as private military contractors.  

The heist mechanics, which stressed planning and teamwork in GTA Online, would also carry over into Red Dead Redemption 2. Military forts entrenched deep in the wilderness, trains running supplies between towns, and big city banks are all ripe targets for aspiring criminals.

Looking at the trajectory of Rockstar’s open-world multiplayer ambitions, we expect Red Dead Redemption 2 to continue the meteoric growth. All the speculative ideas about how the progress made in Grand Theft Auto Online could serve as a jumping off point for another round of innovation excite us, and we’re curious to hear your thoughts. What features would you like to see implemented for our next online adventure in the Wild West? Share them in the comments below. 

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Dead Rising 4 Is Getting Street Fighter Clothes And Harder Difficulties With Free DLC

Capcom has announced some free DLC (and a patch) coming to Dead Rising 4 on Xbox One right before the end of the month.

The DLC is bundled with a patch to address some of the game's bugs, and it adds two additional difficulty modes and new costumes. In the new difficulties, weapons break faster, zombies bite harder, and health restoration items restore less. Five new Street Fighter costumes will also appear in Frank's costume, three of which you can see above.

The patch and DLC will be available on January 30. Additionally, a trial version of the game, which will let players play for 60 minutes (in single-player and/or co-op) and bring their progress forward if they decided to purchase the full game, will be available on January 31.

For our review of Dead Rising 4, head here.

[Source: Capcom Unity]

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Blog: Analyzing narrative choices in Telltale’s The Walking Dead

A short analysis of narrative choices presented in Season 2 of Telltale’s The Walking Dead. …


Gamasutra News

Science-Fiction Weekly – Dead Effect 2, Exclusive Look At New Dreadnought Ships

If you consider yourself a big mobile gamer, you may be familiar with the name Dead Effect. According to the series' developer, Bad Fly Interactive, Dead Effect 2 has been downloaded over seven million times on mobile devices since its launch on October 28, 2015. Don't worry, I had no clue this series existed either, which is unfortunate since I'm loving the hell out of the Xbox One port. The game hit Xbox Live and PlayStation Network last week, and I think it's worth a look, but not for typical reasons.

Don't read too much into Dead Effect 2's name; it isn't an amalgamation of Mass Effect and Dead Space. Bad Fly has paved its own path into the science-fiction world with a zombie-killing experience that embraces camp to a degree we rarely see. As much as Dead Effect 2 tries to deliver intense run-and-gun action, the real fun comes from the hilarious spoken dialogue. The type of humor that is deployed is hard to read, but that's part of what makes it fun. I honestly don't know if this game is supposed to be comedic or not. Did Bad Fly try to make cool characters
and missed the mark entirely? Or do they have masterful command of all things cheese? No matter what the intended result was, if you love watching low-budget Syfy movies,
this game is fired from the same Ion Cannon.

That's not to say the gameplay isn't fun. It's a little sloppy control-wise, and the A.I. loves running into bullet showers, but the gunplay feels nice and the action rarely has a lull in it, delivering nicely in enemy variety and making each conflict feel like a real fight.

Don't expect much from the story, however. Yes, it's technically science-fiction, but outside of the outer-space setting (on the Spaceship ESS Meridian), and a lab experiment gone awry, killing is the name of the game. The tight corridors don't offer much in terms of maneuverability, but swinging swords or using high-powered weapons to down zombie dogs and brain-eating astronauts is oddly satisfying. I'm four hours into the adventure, and it's holding my interest nicely. Along with the humor, the game offers a surprising amount of depth in its weapons (of which there are over 300), as well as the various upgrade systems. Implants deliver combat boosts like strength bonuses, improved accuracy (through new eyes), and other things that can enhance your potential. The player also levels up, and points can be exchanged for new class-based abilities. If you choose a melee character like I did, you can equip one special such as a ground slam or the ability to pull or throw enemies. Points can alternatively be used to activate 14 special abilities, as well as general or weapon abilities. Like I said, it has depth, but camp remains the star.

I haven't said "Xbox record that" this much while playing a game before. I couldn't believe the ridiculous stuff my character was saying, and the people around him are just as silly and hard to believe. Here's how a typical conversation unfolds in Dead Effect 2:

(Please visit the site to view this media)

And I know you want to see more of Minikin, so here he is in action:

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Finally, take a look at a boss fight. I have no idea why he explodes at the end, but I approve. Why not make him explode is the real question here.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

That's Dead Effect 2. If you enjoy watching Game Informer's Super Replay series, I have a feeling you enjoyed the clips I shared and want to see more. The entire game is filled with content just like this. It's currently retailing for $ 20 on Steam, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One.

Now let's talk about Dreadnought. I raved about piloting a capital-class ship in this game a few weeks ago, and now we're getting an intimate look at several new vessels, along with "Hero Ships" that should be available when the game launches later this year. Hero Ships are uniquely designed, giving players instant access to high-end weapons and modules. The catch: These beefed-up alternatives are micro-transactions. As developer Yager points out, "While Hero Ships don't give you an outright advantage in battle, they do offer more specialized options."

Yager provided Science-Fiction Weekly an exclusive look at six vessels. The first three fall into the Dreadnought-class designed by Jupiter Arms, a manufacturer of weapons and defense systems. As Yager points out, "[Jupiter Arms'] employees live and work
in pursuit of a common purpose: to build the best, most efficiently
destructive tech in the Solar System."

Jutland
Tier IV
Length: 591m
Mass: 2,570,000t
Crew: 2,600

The Jutland was taken to the frontlines of all post-War raider skirmishes in the Jovian system, crushing its enemies with its heavy-caliber guns. Commissioned by Jupiter Arms' Shiphead Machia, the Jutland is one of the biggest, slowest and sturdiest ships in the Jupiter Arms fleet and it is still a mystery how it the well-guarded monster ship ended up on Sinley Bay.


Monarch
Tier V
Length:
664m
Mass: 3,590,000t
Crew: 2,700

The Monarch is a true behemoth. Solid and armed to the teeth with Heavy Ballistic Cannons, its close-range power is second to none. While the Monarch packs guns that can decimate the sides of any vessel, it is the slowest, least-agile ship in the Solar System.
This gargantuan Dreadnought was originally captained by Shiphead Rout as the flagship of Jupiter Arms’ fleet. Its strength and durability have since been pushed to unrivaled levels.


Trident (Hero Ship)
Tier IV
Length:
692m
Mass: 4,276,800t
Crew: 2,400
This Monarch-class Dreadnought is a weapon of vengeance. Commanded by Captain Melville Blanco under the banner of the Pan-Colonial Fleet, this flagship represents its captain’s crushing defeat at the hands of a Transhuman Dreadnought—and obsessive pursuit of retribution.

The final three ships are tactical cruisers from Akula Vektor, which Yager describes as a "combination of two megacorps: Akula, a defense
manufacturer, and Vektor, a producer of anti-gravity systems and other
civil tech. Its members are unsophisticated, no-nonsense realists, but
their ultimate goal is steadfastly optimistic: to create a battleship
that is incapable of being destroyed."


Koschei
Tier IV
Length:
270m
Mass: 384,920t
Crew: 280

Legend has it that the audacious Ambassador Spinoza Dek always flew the Koschei right to the front of skirmishes, although the traditional position of a Tac Cruiser is at the back. As a tribute to Captain Dek's hubris, this ship was converted into an ironclad tactical cruiser right at home on the frontlines.


Okhta
Tier V
Length:
303m
Mass: 428,800t
Crew: 350

The slow, thick-armored Ohkta is designed to do two things: heal allies, and soak up damage like a tank. Its healing-only primary weapon makes it perfect for repairing teammates from a safe, defensive position.

The Ohkta was commissioned by Akula’s Director of Ethical Hacking, General Reid Guth, who sought to create “the queen of all support vessels.” After Guth defected to Sinley Bay, he pushed it far beyond its original specs.


Kali (Hero Ship)
Tier IV
Length:
318m
Mass: 490,100t
Crew: 540

The Kali is the Flagship of Commodore Rajesh, head of security at Akula’s refinery moon Phoebe. Rajesh is notorious for his cruelty and the crews in his fleet are famous for their efficiency. The Kali is a legend amongst mercenaries who have attempted to attack Phoebe and survived – they tell tales of a seemingly indestructible fleet, made almost invulnerable by the Kali's unstoppable support prowess.

Out of these six ships, the I'm looking forward to flying the Trident the most. That's a nice looking ship, and it's called a "weapon of vengeance." You can't really top that.

That's it for this week's Science-Fiction Weekly. I can think of no better way to end this column than with more Minikin. Enjoy!

(Please visit the site to view this media)

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Blog: Analyzing the nature of choice in The Walking Dead

Let’s look at the nature of choices in Telltale’s The Walking Dead, and how they affect the experience and characters. …


Gamasutra News

The Walking Dead: A New Frontier – Ties That Bind Parts I & II Review

With the
abundance of zombies in entertainment, surprising people with the undead is
challenging. Blood is shed, fragile mental states break, lives are lost, and
somehow people press on despite the worst of circumstances. Telltale's The
Walking Dead has tried to make things feel different by focusing its zombie adventure
on relationships, making tough choices, and allowing the player to role-play
different characters. A New Frontier continues these efforts, and they usually
work, but sometimes déjà vu creeps in, making scenes less impactful. You can
only see so many deaths and safe havens before it all feels the same.

In season
one, we took control of Lee Everett, a man who formed a touching bond with a
little girl named Clementine. Season two allowed us to step into Clementine's
shoes and experience the situation from a child's perspective. Telltale's third
season puts us in the role of Javier, a man whose life has been on a downward
spiral, with Clementine becoming more of a sidekick in his journey. In many
ways, A New Frontier is about the mysteries surrounding the pair, and that's
how Telltale keeps you intrigued.

The opening two
episodes set the stage for the new adventure. They have everything you've come
to expect from The Walking Dead: shocking deaths, intense betrayals, and
split-second decisions to second-guess. Ties That Bind mostly focuses on
familial bonds – the risks we take for the people we love and how far we're
willing to go to put another's life above our own. The story begins with
background on Javier, who comes home after taking a wrong turn in his life, but
Telltale keeps the secret lingering as to exactly what happened. Then time skips
ahead to Javier on the road with his niece, nephew, and sister-in-law, fleeing
from a large swarm of walkers. Javier is a likeable protagonist; you can tell he
cares about his family and will do whatever he can to keep them safe. However,
we don't know the secrets that lurk in his past. He reminds of me Lee in that
way – something feels inherently good about him, but you know he hasn't lived a
perfect life.

Season three
has flashback sequences which slowly provide more information about the past,
including Clementine's. At the end of season two, she could end up in three
different scenarios depending on your choices. These choices are addressed in
the flashbacks, allowing you to see what's happened to Clementine since we last
saw her. I won't spoil anything, but Clementine has definitely seen some hard
times, and she's a different person because of it. I enjoyed this character
development, as it's clear the apocalypse has taken its toll on her over time.
However, I wish my season two ending choices mattered more than they appear so
far.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Once
Clementine and Javier meet, they get in bigger trouble when they encounter a
dangerous and mysterious gang. The plot kept me invested enough, despite some
eye-rolling scenes (like when Javier and his sister-in-law smoke pot while the
kids are asleep). Be prepared for a slow drip of information; the plot setup
takes awhile, but it makes the bigger reveals pay off later.

If you've
played previous seasons, you know what to expect from Telltale's gameplay. QTEs
execute all melee actions, and you need to aim your gun and click a button to
fire at zombies. Searching the environment for objects to solve problems and
chatting with characters to build relationships remains a big element. To
Telltale's credit, searching is a lot better thanks to the interactive objects
standing out better. I never felt like I was wandering around aimlessly just to
find the next object to advance the plot. The best choices still come when
you've got very limited time to respond, causing you to second-guess what
you've done in the heat of the moment, especially when your options are to try
to talk it through or reach for your gun. I was constantly juggling the feeling
of wanting to be peaceful, but worrying if I didn't strike first, something
even more awful would occur.

My biggest
complaint is that some dialogue options don't lead where you intend them to.
For instance, I chose to stand up for a certain character, but that led to Javier exposing one of that person's secrets and straining the relationship.
It may add unpredictability, but it's a problem
when characters act the opposite of what you intend.

Everything leads up to a hell of a cliffhanger,
making me intrigued to see what happens next. I just hope Telltale doesn't
disappoint with its result, as in the past some of the cliffhangers have had
unsatisfying resolutions, not altering the story as much as I expected. While
some things remain predictable, like needing to constantly look for resources
or evil people showing up at the worst times, Telltale does a good job with its
reveals and twists. As long as they continue to lead to interesting places, I'm
on board for the rest of season three 

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