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Watch the trailer for the 2017 Game Developers Choice Awards!

From Campo Santo to id to Owlchemy Labs, come and watch some of the 17th Annual Game Developers Choice Awards nominees extend a personal invitation to watch the show live during GDC 2017 next week! …


Gamasutra News

Take your career in games to the next level at GDC 2017!

GDC is happening next week, and show officials want to remind you about the great career growth and networking opportunities attendees can take advantage of at the show! …


Gamasutra News

GDC 2017 is next week! Follow along on Gamasutra’s official event page

Game Developers Conference 2017 is just around the corner, and Gamasutra reporters will be onsite bringing you loads of stories. Follow along on our event page here! …


Gamasutra News

Your 2017 Guide To Pokémon Go Eggs, Evolution Items, And More

Pokémon Go captured the world when it launched in summer 2016.
Beyond the excitement of traveling to new locations to catch monsters and meet
like-minded trainers, one of the things that made Niantic's collaboration with
The Pokémon Company so interesting was the mystery that surrounded nearly every
element about the game.

The mystery was thrilling at first, but after a while, being
in the dark wore on users of the app, and they decided to do something about
it. Players scoured their local areas, data-mined the app, and started
crowd-sourced sites on where to find the best monsters and how to be the most
efficient trainers they could be.

Each time a new major update hits, the sense of mystery in
Pokémon Go is reinvigorated. However, thanks to the methods discovered and
created by players in the original release, light is shed on each successive
update quicker than ever before.

Check out the latest information on Pokémon Go below, and if
you have anything you think would be helpful to add, let us know in the
comments section.

People Still Play
Pokémon Go?

Yes. Lots. As recently as February 22, 2017, it was the
top-grossing app in the iOS App Store. Alright, now that we have that out of
the way…

Well, I've never
played it. How do I start and what should I focus on at first?

Well, all you need to do is download it on the iOS App Store
or the Google Play store. It's a free app with optional microtransactions. Once
you're in, you'll be asked to choose a starter Pokémon. You can choose between
Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle, or do a secret trick to get Pikachu as your
starter
.

Once you're up and running, simply walk around
and start catching things that you encounter and spinning the disks of each
PokéStop you stumble upon to earn items. Each new monster brings you one step
closer to filling up your Pokédex, which is for many, the ultimate goal of the
game. Each time you catch a Pokémon, you earn candies, which can be used to
evolve some Pokémon or, when combined with stardust, power them up. I'd
recommend holding off on powering up any Pokémon until you get to a higher
level, as each time you level up your profile, you are able to catch more
powerful monsters. Until then, just save up your candies not used for evolution
and stockpile any stardust – you'll love having an abundance of stardust later
on when your monsters are ready to take on gyms. For more on gym battles, head
here

Where Can I Find A
Specific Pokémon?

Due to the nature of Pokémon Go's spawns, there is
unfortunately no reliable way to tell you to go to a specific spot to always
catch a specific Pokémon. However, many monsters do "nest" in the game, meaning
that if you go to a particular spot while their nest is located there, you're
likely to catch several of that monster.

Nests are not mentioned in Pokémon Go itself, but you can
find out what nests are around you (and even search on specific species of
Pokémon) using The Silph Road's Nest Atlas tool. This tool features reliable
crowd-sourced information from Pokémon Go players all over the world who report
the nests they encounter.

If you find an accessible nest of a creature
that you need, it's not a good idea to wait. Nests migrate approximately every
two weeks, which means many of the nests near you will be replaced by another
creature. The silver lining is that the Weedle nest next to your house could
very well become a Kabuto nest for a couple of weeks. 

What Pokémon Are
Region-Exclusive?

Just like in the mainline Pokémon games, some monsters can
only be found in certain regions. Check out the full list of known regional
exclusives below.

  • Tauros – North America
  • Farfetch'd – Asia
  • Mr. Mime – Europe
  • Kangaskhan – Australia
  • Heracross – Central and South America, Southern
    Florida and Texas
  • Corsola – Tropical Regions (Appears to be within
    30 degrees of the equator)

[Source:
Reddit]

What Do I Get From
Eggs?

If you can't find a particular Pokémon, sometimes the best
way to find it is to leave it up to the roulette that is hatching eggs. You get
eggs from PokéStops and can hold up to nine at a time. In order to hatch eggs,
you must equip an incubator and walk the distance required for the type of egg
it is.

Each trainer is provided one incubator that can be used an
infinite amount of time. Additional incubators can be earned through leveling
up (though that becomes much rarer at higher levels), but the easiest way to
get more incubators is to buy them for 150 Pokécoins each in Pokémon Go's
in-app shop. Unfortunately, every incubator earned or purchased outside of the
original one can only be used to hatch three eggs.

A popular strategy is to use limited-use incubators on 5km
and 10km eggs, while only using the unlimited-use incubator every trainer has
on the multitude of 2km eggs you're sure to encounter. This will ensure you
don't burn through your premium incubators on eggs that not only hatch quickly,
but are also less likely to yield anything good. In addition, the higher the
egg distance, the more candy you'll receive for the Pokémon that hatches.

These eggs look different based on how far you must walk to
hatch them. 2km eggs are colored with green spots, 5km eggs feature yellow
spots, while 10km eggs have blue spots. While it might sound like you'd only
want 2km eggs so that you can burn through them and gather as many Pokémon as
quickly as possible, the higher the distance required by the egg, the better
the pool of Pokémon is that can hatch from it.

You cannot acquire regional exclusive Pokémon from eggs not
found in those regions, and stats have shown that if you visit the same PokéStops
every day, you'll likely hatch the same handful of Pokémon each time. In
addition, only the most basic form of that Pokémon's evolution chain is able to
be hatched, meaning you'll never find a Charizard or Dragonite in your eggs,
but rather those Pokémon's pre-evolution forms, Charmander and Dratini.

To see what species of Pokémon come from each egg type,
check out the most recent list below.

2km Eggs

  • Bulbasaur
  • Caterpie
  • Ekans
  • Zubat
  • Diglett
  • Bellsprout
  • Gastly
  • Goldeen
  • Igglybuff
  • Chikorita
  • Pichu
  • Togepi
  • Charmander
  • Weedle
  • Nidoran (M)
  • Oddish
  • Abra
  • Geodude
  • Krabby
  • Magikarp
  • Aipom
  • Cyndaquil
  • Remoraid
  • Squirtle
  • Spearow
  • Nidoran (F)
  • Venonat
  • Machop
  • Slowpoke
  • Exeggcute
  • Cleffa
  • Misdreavus
  • Totodile
  • Slugma

5km Eggs

  • Sandshrew
  • Meowth
  • Growlithe
  • Ponyta
  • Seel
  • Onix
  • Cubone
  • Rhyhorn
  • Staryu
  • Eevee
  • Kabuto
  • Yanma
  • Magby
  • Shuckle
  • Tyrogue
  • Dunsparce
  • Vulpix
  • Psyduck
  • Poliwag
  • Magnemite
  • Grimer
  • Drowzee
  • Lickitung
  • Tangela
  • Scyther
  • Porygon
  • Elekid
  • Girafarig
  • Phanpy
  • Smoochum
  • Wobbuffet
  • Regional Exclusives
  • Paras
  • Mankey
  • Tentacool
  • Doduo
  • Shellder
  • Voltorb
  • Koffing
  • Horsea
  • Pinsir
  • Omanyte
  • Sneasel
  • Natu
  • Qwilfish
  • Stantler
  • Wooper

10km Eggs

  • Chansey
  • Aerodactyl
  • Dratini
  • Miltank
  • Mantine
  • Pineco
  • Sudowoodo
  • Lapras
  • Snorlax
  • Gligar
  • Larvitar
  • Mareep
  • Skarmory

[Source: Pokémon Go Hub]

On the next page, we get into coins, Legendary Pokémon, Evolution Items, trading, and more!


www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Your 2017 Guide To Pokémon Go Eggs, Evolution Items, And More

Pokémon Go captured the world when it launched in summer 2016.
Beyond the excitement of traveling to new locations to catch monsters and meet
like-minded trainers, one of the things that made Niantic's collaboration with
The Pokémon Company so interesting was the mystery that surrounded nearly every
element about the game.

The mystery was thrilling at first, but after a while, being
in the dark wore on users of the app, and they decided to do something about
it. Players scoured their local areas, data-mined the app, and started
crowd-sourced sites on where to find the best monsters and how to be the most
efficient trainers they could be.

Each time a new major update hits, the sense of mystery in
Pokémon Go is reinvigorated. However, thanks to the methods discovered and
created by players in the original release, light is shed on each successive
update quicker than ever before.

Check out the latest information on Pokémon Go below, and if
you have anything you think would be helpful to add, let us know in the
comments section.

People Still Play
Pokémon Go?

Yes. Lots. As recently as February 22, 2017, it was the
top-grossing app in the iOS App Store. Alright, now that we have that out of
the way…

Well, I've never
played it. How do I start and what should I focus on at first?

Well, all you need to do is download it on the iOS App Store
or the Google Play store. It's a free app with optional microtransactions. Once
you're in, you'll be asked to choose a starter Pokémon. You can choose between
Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle, or do a secret trick to get Pikachu as your
starter
.

Once you're up and running, simply walk around
and start catching things that you encounter and spinning the disks of each
PokéStop you stumble upon to earn items. Each new monster brings you one step
closer to filling up your Pokédex, which is for many, the ultimate goal of the
game. Each time you catch a Pokémon, you earn candies, which can be used to
evolve some Pokémon or, when combined with stardust, power them up. I'd
recommend holding off on powering up any Pokémon until you get to a higher
level, as each time you level up your profile, you are able to catch more
powerful monsters. Until then, just save up your candies not used for evolution
and stockpile any stardust – you'll love having an abundance of stardust later
on when your monsters are ready to take on gyms. For more on gym battles, head
here

Where Can I Find A
Specific Pokémon?

Due to the nature of Pokémon Go's spawns, there is
unfortunately no reliable way to tell you to go to a specific spot to always
catch a specific Pokémon. However, many monsters do "nest" in the game, meaning
that if you go to a particular spot while their nest is located there, you're
likely to catch several of that monster.

Nests are not mentioned in Pokémon Go itself, but you can
find out what nests are around you (and even search on specific species of
Pokémon) using The Silph Road's Nest Atlas tool. This tool features reliable
crowd-sourced information from Pokémon Go players all over the world who report
the nests they encounter.

If you find an accessible nest of a creature
that you need, it's not a good idea to wait. Nests migrate approximately every
two weeks, which means many of the nests near you will be replaced by another
creature. The silver lining is that the Weedle nest next to your house could
very well become a Kabuto nest for a couple of weeks. 

What Pokémon Are
Region-Exclusive?

Just like in the mainline Pokémon games, some monsters can
only be found in certain regions. Check out the full list of known regional
exclusives below.

  • Tauros – North America
  • Farfetch'd – Asia
  • Mr. Mime – Europe
  • Kangaskhan – Australia
  • Heracross – Central and South America, Southern
    Florida and Texas
  • Corsola – Tropical Regions (Appears to be within
    30 degrees of the equator)

[Source:
Reddit]

What Do I Get From
Eggs?

If you can't find a particular Pokémon, sometimes the best
way to find it is to leave it up to the roulette that is hatching eggs. You get
eggs from PokéStops and can hold up to nine at a time. In order to hatch eggs,
you must equip an incubator and walk the distance required for the type of egg
it is.

Each trainer is provided one incubator that can be used an
infinite amount of time. Additional incubators can be earned through leveling
up (though that becomes much rarer at higher levels), but the easiest way to
get more incubators is to buy them for 150 Pokécoins each in Pokémon Go's
in-app shop. Unfortunately, every incubator earned or purchased outside of the
original one can only be used to hatch three eggs.

A popular strategy is to use limited-use incubators on 5km
and 10km eggs, while only using the unlimited-use incubator every trainer has
on the multitude of 2km eggs you're sure to encounter. This will ensure you
don't burn through your premium incubators on eggs that not only hatch quickly,
but are also less likely to yield anything good. In addition, the higher the
egg distance, the more candy you'll receive for the Pokémon that hatches.

These eggs look different based on how far you must walk to
hatch them. 2km eggs are colored with green spots, 5km eggs feature yellow
spots, while 10km eggs have blue spots. While it might sound like you'd only
want 2km eggs so that you can burn through them and gather as many Pokémon as
quickly as possible, the higher the distance required by the egg, the better
the pool of Pokémon is that can hatch from it.

You cannot acquire regional exclusive Pokémon from eggs not
found in those regions, and stats have shown that if you visit the same PokéStops
every day, you'll likely hatch the same handful of Pokémon each time. In
addition, only the most basic form of that Pokémon's evolution chain is able to
be hatched, meaning you'll never find a Charizard or Dragonite in your eggs,
but rather those Pokémon's pre-evolution forms, Charmander and Dratini.

To see what species of Pokémon come from each egg type,
check out the most recent list below.

2km Eggs

  • Bulbasaur
  • Caterpie
  • Ekans
  • Zubat
  • Diglett
  • Bellsprout
  • Gastly
  • Goldeen
  • Igglybuff
  • Chikorita
  • Pichu
  • Togepi
  • Charmander
  • Weedle
  • Nidoran (M)
  • Oddish
  • Abra
  • Geodude
  • Krabby
  • Magikarp
  • Aipom
  • Cyndaquil
  • Remoraid
  • Squirtle
  • Spearow
  • Nidoran (F)
  • Venonat
  • Machop
  • Slowpoke
  • Exeggcute
  • Cleffa
  • Misdreavus
  • Totodile
  • Slugma

5km Eggs

  • Sandshrew
  • Meowth
  • Growlithe
  • Ponyta
  • Seel
  • Onix
  • Cubone
  • Rhyhorn
  • Staryu
  • Eevee
  • Kabuto
  • Yanma
  • Magby
  • Shuckle
  • Tyrogue
  • Dunsparce
  • Vulpix
  • Psyduck
  • Poliwag
  • Magnemite
  • Grimer
  • Drowzee
  • Lickitung
  • Tangela
  • Scyther
  • Porygon
  • Elekid
  • Girafarig
  • Phanpy
  • Smoochum
  • Wobbuffet
  • Regional Exclusives
  • Paras
  • Mankey
  • Tentacool
  • Doduo
  • Shellder
  • Voltorb
  • Koffing
  • Horsea
  • Pinsir
  • Omanyte
  • Sneasel
  • Natu
  • Qwilfish
  • Stantler
  • Wooper

10km Eggs

  • Chansey
  • Aerodactyl
  • Dratini
  • Miltank
  • Mantine
  • Pineco
  • Sudowoodo
  • Lapras
  • Snorlax
  • Gligar
  • Larvitar
  • Mareep
  • Skarmory

[Source: Pokémon Go Hub]

On the next page, we get into coins, Legendary Pokémon, Evolution Items, trading, and more!


www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Your 2017 Guide To Pokémon Go Eggs, Evolution Items, And More

Pokémon Go captured the world when it launched in summer 2016.
Beyond the excitement of traveling to new locations to catch monsters and meet
like-minded trainers, one of the things that made Niantic's collaboration with
The Pokémon Company so interesting was the mystery that surrounded nearly every
element about the game.

The mystery was thrilling at first, but after a while, being
in the dark wore on users of the app, and they decided to do something about
it. Players scoured their local areas, data-mined the app, and started
crowd-sourced sites on where to find the best monsters and how to be the most
efficient trainers they could be.

Each time a new major update hits, the sense of mystery in
Pokémon Go is reinvigorated. However, thanks to the methods discovered and
created by players in the original release, light is shed on each successive
update quicker than ever before.

Check out the latest information on Pokémon Go below, and if
you have anything you think would be helpful to add, let us know in the
comments section.

People Still Play
Pokémon Go?

Yes. Lots. As recently as February 22, 2017, it was the
top-grossing app in the iOS App Store. Alright, now that we have that out of
the way…

Well, I've never
played it. How do I start and what should I focus on at first?

Well, all you need to do is download it on the iOS App Store
or the Google Play store. It's a free app with optional microtransactions. Once
you're in, you'll be asked to choose a starter Pokémon. You can choose between
Bulbasaur, Charmander, and Squirtle, or do a secret trick to get Pikachu as your
starter
.

Once you're up and running, simply walk around
and start catching things that you encounter and spinning the disks of each
PokéStop you stumble upon to earn items. Each new monster brings you one step
closer to filling up your Pokédex, which is for many, the ultimate goal of the
game. Each time you catch a Pokémon, you earn candies, which can be used to
evolve some Pokémon or, when combined with stardust, power them up. I'd
recommend holding off on powering up any Pokémon until you get to a higher
level, as each time you level up your profile, you are able to catch more
powerful monsters. Until then, just save up your candies not used for evolution
and stockpile any stardust – you'll love having an abundance of stardust later
on when your monsters are ready to take on gyms. For more on gym battles, head
here

Where Can I Find A
Specific Pokémon?

Due to the nature of Pokémon Go's spawns, there is
unfortunately no reliable way to tell you to go to a specific spot to always
catch a specific Pokémon. However, many monsters do "nest" in the game, meaning
that if you go to a particular spot while their nest is located there, you're
likely to catch several of that monster.

Nests are not mentioned in Pokémon Go itself, but you can
find out what nests are around you (and even search on specific species of
Pokémon) using The Silph Road's Nest Atlas tool. This tool features reliable
crowd-sourced information from Pokémon Go players all over the world who report
the nests they encounter.

If you find an accessible nest of a creature
that you need, it's not a good idea to wait. Nests migrate approximately every
two weeks, which means many of the nests near you will be replaced by another
creature. The silver lining is that the Weedle nest next to your house could
very well become a Kabuto nest for a couple of weeks. 

What Pokémon Are
Region-Exclusive?

Just like in the mainline Pokémon games, some monsters can
only be found in certain regions. Check out the full list of known regional
exclusives below.

  • Tauros – North America
  • Farfetch'd – Asia
  • Mr. Mime – Europe
  • Kangaskhan – Australia
  • Heracross – Central and South America, Southern
    Florida and Texas
  • Corsola – Tropical Regions (Appears to be within
    30 degrees of the equator)

[Source:
Reddit]

What Do I Get From
Eggs?

If you can't find a particular Pokémon, sometimes the best
way to find it is to leave it up to the roulette that is hatching eggs. You get
eggs from PokéStops and can hold up to nine at a time. In order to hatch eggs,
you must equip an incubator and walk the distance required for the type of egg
it is.

Each trainer is provided one incubator that can be used an
infinite amount of time. Additional incubators can be earned through leveling
up (though that becomes much rarer at higher levels), but the easiest way to
get more incubators is to buy them for 150 Pokécoins each in Pokémon Go's
in-app shop. Unfortunately, every incubator earned or purchased outside of the
original one can only be used to hatch three eggs.

A popular strategy is to use limited-use incubators on 5km
and 10km eggs, while only using the unlimited-use incubator every trainer has
on the multitude of 2km eggs you're sure to encounter. This will ensure you
don't burn through your premium incubators on eggs that not only hatch quickly,
but are also less likely to yield anything good. In addition, the higher the
egg distance, the more candy you'll receive for the Pokémon that hatches.

These eggs look different based on how far you must walk to
hatch them. 2km eggs are colored with green spots, 5km eggs feature yellow
spots, while 10km eggs have blue spots. While it might sound like you'd only
want 2km eggs so that you can burn through them and gather as many Pokémon as
quickly as possible, the higher the distance required by the egg, the better
the pool of Pokémon is that can hatch from it.

You cannot acquire regional exclusive Pokémon from eggs not
found in those regions, and stats have shown that if you visit the same PokéStops
every day, you'll likely hatch the same handful of Pokémon each time. In
addition, only the most basic form of that Pokémon's evolution chain is able to
be hatched, meaning you'll never find a Charizard or Dragonite in your eggs,
but rather those Pokémon's pre-evolution forms, Charmander and Dratini.

To see what species of Pokémon come from each egg type,
check out the most recent list below.

2km Eggs

  • Bulbasaur
  • Caterpie
  • Ekans
  • Zubat
  • Diglett
  • Bellsprout
  • Gastly
  • Goldeen
  • Igglybuff
  • Chikorita
  • Pichu
  • Togepi
  • Charmander
  • Weedle
  • Nidoran (M)
  • Oddish
  • Abra
  • Geodude
  • Krabby
  • Magikarp
  • Aipom
  • Cyndaquil
  • Remoraid
  • Squirtle
  • Spearow
  • Nidoran (F)
  • Venonat
  • Machop
  • Slowpoke
  • Exeggcute
  • Cleffa
  • Misdreavus
  • Totodile
  • Slugma

5km Eggs

  • Sandshrew
  • Meowth
  • Growlithe
  • Ponyta
  • Seel
  • Onix
  • Cubone
  • Rhyhorn
  • Staryu
  • Eevee
  • Kabuto
  • Yanma
  • Magby
  • Shuckle
  • Tyrogue
  • Dunsparce
  • Vulpix
  • Psyduck
  • Poliwag
  • Magnemite
  • Grimer
  • Drowzee
  • Lickitung
  • Tangela
  • Scyther
  • Porygon
  • Elekid
  • Girafarig
  • Phanpy
  • Smoochum
  • Wobbuffet
  • Regional Exclusives
  • Paras
  • Mankey
  • Tentacool
  • Doduo
  • Shellder
  • Voltorb
  • Koffing
  • Horsea
  • Pinsir
  • Omanyte
  • Sneasel
  • Natu
  • Qwilfish
  • Stantler
  • Wooper

10km Eggs

  • Chansey
  • Aerodactyl
  • Dratini
  • Miltank
  • Mantine
  • Pineco
  • Sudowoodo
  • Lapras
  • Snorlax
  • Gligar
  • Larvitar
  • Mareep
  • Skarmory

[Source: Pokémon Go Hub]

On the next page, we get into coins, Legendary Pokémon, Evolution Items, trading, and more!


www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

At GDC 2017, get expert tips on improving your game’s user experience

At GDC 2017 next week, veteran game devs from across the industry will have a boisterous discussion about the effects of data, creativity, and development constraints on the user experience in games. …


Gamasutra News

Check out this lineup of cool interactive spaces at GDC 2017!

GDC 2017 is next week in San Francisco! While you’re planning out what to see and do, organizers want to make sure you set some time aside to check out these great interactive spaces at GDC this year. …


Gamasutra News

These are your ‘Best In Play’ winners for GDC Play 2017!

GDC organizers have revealed the ‘Best in Play’ awards for exhibitors in the on-site GDC Play 2017 event, honoring remarkable games like Beholder and Far: Lone Sails! …


Gamasutra News

Learn level design tricks from an Arkane designer at GDC 2017!

Arkane’s own Steve Lee, a level designer on Dishonored 2, will be giving a fantastic talk on holistic level design as part of the GDC 2017 Level Design Workshop. …


Gamasutra News