Master of The Free World Productions | Jumpcut Entertainment Network

Marvel And Netflix Confirm Luke Cage Season 2

While this isn't the most surprising news, it's still exciting: Netflix and Marvel's Luke Cage series will be returning for a second season. Both companies teased the news on Twitter, which contains a brief video showing the words "season two coming soon" flickering on a neon sign on the exterior of Pop’s Barber Shop.

You can view the tweet below, which is also accompanied by the words "Always Forward."

Luke Cage was a big success for both Marvel and Netflix, though it's unclear exactly when the series will make its return. Especially since we are still awaiting Jessica Jones season 2 and Iron Fist's debut

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Cowboys Battle Dinosaurs In PlayStation VR’s Dino Frontier

Dino Frontier is a tabletop-scale VR simulation that lets players build their own Wild West city in a world infested with dinosaurs. This strange idea comes from developer Uber Entertainment, the team behind Monday Night Combat, Planetary Annihilation, and the PlayStation VR launch title, Wayward Sky.

Uber had a playable version of Dino Frontier on hand at this year's PlayStation Experience in Anaheim, CA, and I had the chance to put the game through its paces, finding it to be remarkably simple, yet loaded with potential. After putting on the PlayStation VR headset, I was surprised to see the world has a pop-up book quality to it. It isn't that big, but it still manages to deliver a sense of considerable scale when you see just how small the settlement and characters are within it. The player lords over this terrain like a god, similar in a way to Peter Molyneux's Black & White and Populous titles.

Two PlayStation Move controllers are used to bring your hands into the world. When you click the trigger buttons, you see your hands make grabbing motions. There isn't much to the gameplay outside of grabbing things, but that simplicity works well to a degree. When the game begins you see a small settlement with one person aimlessly wandering around it. The first goal is to put him to work; a task that simply asks you to pick him up and drop him into the lone building. He then becomes a woodsman who will chop down trees to gather enough resources to build another building. His efforts produce a saloon, which attracts a handful of other people to settle in the town. The next task is to keep them well fed. This means we have to hunt down dinosaurs. Placing them in the market turns them into hunters, armed with rifles. While the characters are semi-autonomous, you will have to place a waypoint on the map leading to the type of dinosaur you want them to harvest. To do this, you simply have to grab the flag from the city and place it at the nest, and the hunters will move there.

I had them hunt a pack of raptors. The battle was completely automated, but animated nicely. I lost a few soldiers, but new recruits joined the fray quickly, and the raptors were soon turned into meat. I then tamed a handful of raptors to turn them into mounts, which produces a stronger troop type. This new platoon was used to hunt a tyrannosaurs rex. Again, the battle didn't last long, but I did get a kick out of seeing the T. Rex pick up and fling its food into the air.

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Outside of grabbing things, the only interaction players have with the world at this point is zooming in and scrolling along it. These actions are easily handled by pressing two buttons on both controllers simultaneously and moving the arms outward to expand, or inward to zoom. Scrolling is handled by clicking one button and making a pulling motion to move along the terrain. The game world was so small that neither action was needed, per se, but I did use the zoom function to get a closer look at the battles.

Representatives of Uber's development team tell me that the world will get slightly bigger as the game goes on, and there are more formidable foes than the T. Rex, such as bandits riding T.Rexes.

Dino Frontier's concept is silly and the gameplay is amusing, but I worry about its depth and variety. It clearly shows that simulations are a good fit for VR, but I immediately wanted to have more interaction in the world. I felt a little too much like a voyeur for most of my demo. Uber doesn't have a release date to announce yet, but did tell me that it'll be out at some point in 2017. Here's hoping the final build offers more simulation elements than I saw in this brief tease.

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Nidhogg 2′s Gameplay Justifies Its Art Style

When I saw the first trailer for Nidhogg 2, I didn't like it. The art style was a bit too funky, and a far cry from the minimalistic, expressive look of the first game. It seemed like an unforced error, going from a refined and elegant look to something chaotic and crowded. Watching the game in motion at this year's PlayStation Experience (and playing a few rounds of it), almost all of my doubts were assuaged.

When I asked the person demoing the game to me (and my opponent) about the change in art direction, he told me the team wanted to make sure the game stood out from its predecessor. "We want this to be its own thing," they told me. They know a lot of people like the simple look and gameplay of the original, but wanted to try new things with the sequel. Thus, the art style is a clear indicator. It screams "prepare for something different."

The more I played, the more my doubts about the art style began to fade away. The animations are great, not the least of which is a new, exaggerated stomping animation that plays when one player downs another and attacks their body. The titular Nidhogg (the giant worm that eats whoever makes it far enough on their side of the stage to win the match) looks as grotesque and ugly as you'd want it to, considering its insidious goal. The art as a whole is brutish, but fits with the game's savage competition and gives it a different tone. The naked (but, from what I saw, safe-for-work) bodies of the two competitors emphasized how dehumanizing a competition like this must be, and characters can spawn as different genders. Also, as skeletons.

Nidhogg 2's gameplay isn't wildly different from the first, but it is more varied. In addition to the rapier from the first game, you can now pick up larger claymores or smaller daggers, as well as a bow. As you might expect, the dagger is a bit faster to wield, but doesn't have the range of the other weapons. The claymore is a bit slower, but swings in a wide arc downwards, as opposed to the rapier's refined prods. The bow can fire an infinite number of arrows, but does not kill when thrown. I liked the variety in weapons since it adds to the chaos of having to scrounge your way to the upper hand from what you're given, but I feel like the bow and arrow is a bit too strong. I didn't have many issues evading arrows, but it put me on my toes more than the melee-range weapons, since I knew I was always in danger.

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Besides that, most of the maneuvers in Nidhogg make a return. You can dive kick by pressing the attack button, and roll by crouching down while running. You can do full-body flail if you jump while crouched, which my friends and I dubbed "frogging" back when we played the first game.

Playing a couple of matches with one of the developers, my long-winded sessions of the original game came back to me, and I had a blast. Having to gain a new awareness of your situation every time your character respawns after dying, all while your opponent makes their mad dash for the finish line, still makes for a long of frantic moments that lead to emotions running high for long periods of time. Our first match went for almost six minutes, though I get the feeling the developer I was playing with let me win. But I stilled enjoyed what I played, and the new weapons enhance the game's chaotic feel.

After we wrapped up our demo, I asked the developer if the team was going to go more in-depth about the world of Nidhogg through a more expansive story mode. He told me the story mode won't be expansive, but it'll be more substantial than the original, and offer a few details about the world.

Though the changes Nidhogg 2 makes sound out of step with the simplistic philosophy of the first game, I came away from the sequel eager to play more. I'm more sold on the new art style, and the changes sound like enough to keep me up for a few more nights, yelling at my friends about how they're playing like jerks and how I totally pressed the jump button and should not have fallen into that pit. I swear I did.

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Extended Gameplay Trailer For Marvel Vs. Capcom: Infinite Reveals Morrigan, Captain America

Though we just our first look at Marvel Vs. Capcom: Infinite yesterday, Capcom and Marvel weren't quite done for the weekend. After the conclusion of the ESPN2 Capcom Cup Broadcast, we got a longer cut of the gameplay trailer we saw yesterday, including two new characters: Captain America and Morrigan Aensland.

The two new characters seem pretty faithful to their previous incarnations. Captain America has tried-and-true sheild throw move and Charging Star super, while Morrigan has her shadowy uppercut and Darkness Illusion super. You can watch the two show off their combo prowess below.

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Akuma’s New Street Fighter V Look Betrays A Surprisingly Traditional Moveset

For better and worse, Street Fighter V has established itself as a very different game. It changed some key aspects of the series, emphasized online play and competition over single-player modes, and left out a number of key characters fans have come to love. And the characters who did make it in tended to be very different to their older iterations. Revealed at this year's PlayStation Experience, Akuma might first look like he's following that trend, with his lion's mane and short front cut. But, as a character fans have been asking for, Capcom has kept the rage-filled character pretty faithful to his classic self. After playing a few rounds as him, this feels like the right move.

He's kept his wide assortment of moves intact, including his aerial diagonal fireball, red fireballs Ashura Senku escape tool, demon flip, and dive kick. Considering that many characters' movesets have been trimmed down in Street Fighter V, learning that Akuma had kept most of his was a nice surprised, though it made testing each one of them in-depth a little more difficult. His diagonal fireballs feel slightly faster than they do Street Fighter IV, though still nowhere near as fast as they do in Street Fighter II. His demon flip, which still allows him to transition into a dive kick or slide, feels stronger as a combo tool. Though I wasn't able to pull them off myself, I saw plenty of people go for the demon flip mid-combo and connect it. The EX version of his aerial fireball is a bit different, however, since it has him stay up in the air for a moment then throw a second fireball.

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I had expected his V-System to give him a new tool to play with, and it does. But it doesn't feel nearly as special as it could have been. In essence, it's a more aggressive version of Ryu's, allowing him to parry. However, Akuma can follow his up with a punch or a kick move. This lets him not only more easily punish good reads he makes on his opponent, but lets him use it in combos as well. It's a strong tool and I felt powerful using it, but I feel Capcom could have used the V-System as a way to further distinguish Akuma and Ryu. Instead, it feels like they're playing it safe. 

Akuma's V-Trigger works as a power-up as opposed to a tool, which further associates him with Ryu. While powered up, Akuma can throw diagonal fireballs while jumping backwards, and all of this moves receive some buffs. His fireballs are more durable, his Goshoryuken move is slightly more devastating, and he throws out two fireballs while airborne in slightly different directions (similar to his EX air fireball in Street Fighter IV). It works as way to compliment his already aggressive toolkit, but again, it feels like it lacks the creativity of some of the other V-Triggers in the game. On top of his normal super (which is the Kongo Kokuretsuzan from Street Fighter III), he can use his signature Shun Goku Satsu move by using super while in V-Trigger. How feasible that will be in actual matches I can't say for sure, that approach to the move feels like it's including it just to have it there.

Akuma may be something of an olive branch of players who feel like Street Fighter V isn't adhering to the series' standard formula as much as they would have liked. For one, if you don't like his new look, he has an alternate costume – named "Nostalgia" – that makes him look more like the Akuma fans have come to like. It's not exactly what fans who feel scorned by the game's lack of an arcade mode or more robust single-player options might want, but this is definitely the most traditional character DLC character Capcom has put out, both in terms of character choice and execution. Which, considering Street Fighter still has to win back some of its fans, might be the right step at this point.

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Hands-On Impressions Of Crash Bandcioot N. Sane Trilogy

I remember when Crash Bandicoot was unveiled at the Electronic Entertainment Expo in 1996. I was there. I played the game at Sony's PlayStation booth, and interviewed Jason Rubin, the game's co-creator, who quickly interrupted my first question to tell me that Shigeru Miyamoto had stopped by to play his game. he was beaming with excitement, and understandably so. Crash Bandicoot was the talk of the show. People called it Sony's answer to Mario and Sonic. Flash forward 20 years, and I find myself standing in Sony's booth at PlayStation Expo, starring at a television that is running a demo of Crash Bandicoot.

The moment is surreal, but also fascinating. For all the new games in the room innovating and pushing games forward, Crash Bandicoot has drawn the largest crowd. The game is still special. It still has the "it" factor that caught Miyamoto's eye, and it doesn't appear developer Vicarious Visions is changing much in its effort to remaster it.

Crash's character model is clearly more detailed (and a hell of a lot fuzzier), and the enemies finally have textures, but it plays exactly like it did 20 years ago. I have no problem sliding back into the groove of leaping over chasms, smashing boxes, and spinning through enemies. It's fun, challenging (in a slightly frustrating way), but still the same old Crash I remember, and that's okay.

Representatives from Vicarious Visions tell me that they don't want to change much at all. The maps are identical in design, right down to the boxes not moving from their original placements, which is surprising, since the levels have been rebuilt from scratch, and they look stunning.

Given the name of the game, Vicarious Visions is remastering all three of Naughty Dog's Crash Bandicoot titles. The demo I saw today was of Crash Bandicoot's first level, N. Sanity Beach, and a later stage in Dr. Neo Cortex's castle, called Heavy Machinery. I flew through the first stage, smashing all of the boxes along the way to unlock the diamond reward. Heavy Machinery reminded me of just how precise Crash's spin moves have to be to hit the targets. I struggle with this a little until I figure out the range again. I began by playing on the analog stick (which wasn't a part of the original game), but ended on the d-pad, finding it to be the preferred way to navigate this level.

Along with the analog stick support, the only noticeable changes I see to this remaster are time trial challenges, which unlock after the level is finished. The introductory cutscene is also entirely new, and even features new voice work from many of the same actors. Vicarious Visions also says all three games feature unified checkpoint and save systems. The team teased more features, but wouldn't even give me a hint of what to expect.

No matter what comes next, however, it appears Vicarious Visions is trying to keep the original vision of the game intact as best as it can. It was strange seeing Crash Bandicoot presented as a new game again, but given how much I enjoyed playing it again, it's clear it has timeless appeal. It's one of those classics that could very well entertain a new generation of gamers, even without innovating in over 20 years.

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Nidhogg 2′s Gameplay Justifies Its Art Style

When I saw the first trailer for Nidhogg 2, I didn't like it. The art style was a bit too funky, and a far cry from the minimalistic, expressive look of the first game. It seemed like an unforced error, going from a refined and elegant look to something chaotic and crowded. Watching the game in motion at this year's PlayStation Experience (and playing a few rounds of it), almost all of my doubts were assuaged.

When I asked the person demoing the game to me (and my opponent) about the change in art direction, he told me the team wanted to make sure the game stood out from its predecessor. "We want this to be its own thing," they told me. They know a lot of people like the simple look and gameplay of the original, but wanted to try new things with the sequel. Thus, the art style is a clear indicator. It screams "prepare for something different."

The more I played, the more my doubts about the art style began to fade away. The animations are great, not the least of which is a new, exaggerated stomping animation that plays when one player downs another and attacks their body. The titular Nidhogg (the giant worm that eats whoever makes it far enough on their side of the stage to win the match) looks as grotesque and ugly as you'd want it to, considering its insidious goal. The art as a whole is brutish, but fits with the game's savage competition and gives it a different tone. The naked (but, from what I saw, safe-for-work) bodies of the two competitors emphasized how dehumanizing a competition like this must be, and characters can spawn as different genders. Also, as skeletons.

Nidhogg 2's gameplay isn't wildly different from the first, but it is more varied. In addition to the rapier from the first game, you can now pick up larger claymores or smaller daggers, as well as a bow. As you might expect, the dagger is a bit faster to wield, but doesn't have the range of the other weapons. The claymore is a bit slower, but swings in a wide arc downwards, as opposed to the rapier's refined prods. The bow can fire an infinite number of arrows, but does not kill when thrown. I liked the variety in weapons since it adds to the chaos of having to scrounge your way to the upper hand from what you're given, but I feel like the bow and arrow is a bit too strong. I didn't have many issues evading arrows, but it put me on my toes more than the melee-range weapons, since I knew I was always in danger.

(Please visit the site to view this media)

Besides that, most of the maneuvers in Nidhogg make a return. You can dive kick by pressing the attack button, and roll by crouching down while running. You can do full-body flail if you jump while crouched, which my friends and I dubbed "frogging" back when we played the first game.

Playing a couple of matches with one of the developers, my long-winded sessions of the original game came back to me, and I had a blast. Having to gain a new awareness of your situation every time your character respawns after dying, all while your opponent makes their mad dash for the finish line, still makes for a long of frantic moments that lead to emotions running high for long periods of time. Our first match went for almost six minutes, though I get the feeling the developer I was playing with let me win. But I stilled enjoyed what I played, and the new weapons enhance the game's chaotic feel.

After we wrapped up our demo, I asked the developer if the team was going to go more in-depth about the world of Nidhogg through a more expansive story mode. He told me the story mode won't be expansive, but it'll be more substantial than the original, and offer a few details about the world.

Though the changes Nidhogg 2 makes sound out of step with the simplistic philosophy of the first game, I came away from the sequel eager to play more. I'm more sold on the new art style, and the changes sound like enough to keep me up for a few more nights, yelling at my friends about how they're playing like jerks and how I totally pressed the jump button and should not have fallen into that pit. I swear I did.

www.GameInformer.com – The Feed

Four Indies That Impressed During The PSX Presentation

Pyre, Vane, What Remains of Edith Finch, and Absolver are four incredible looking indie games that should be on your radar for next year.

During the PSX 2016 press conference, Sony hit us with a barrage of impressive-looking titles. Here's what you need to know about each.

Pyre – from the creators of Bastion and Transistor, an action-packed game based on sports-like battles. Features both a single-player campaign and a head-to-head Versus Mode.

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Vane – an atmospheric adventure about unraveling the secrets of an unknown land. The game has a unique art style and powerful soundtrack.

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What Remains of Edith Finch – a collection of strange tales about a family in Washington state. Edith Finch explores her family home and uncovers her family history in an effort to figure out why she's the last one left alive.

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Absolver – an online multiplayer combat RPG where players take part in epic displays of their martial arts prowess.

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Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony Coming In 2017

At PSX 2016, Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony was announced as a 2017 release for PlayStation 4 and Vita. With an all new cast of 16 characters kidnapped and imprisoned in a school, the murder mysteries are are sure to be puzzling and intense.

While not much is known about Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony yet, it will feature new locations, characters, and more murder. If you're not familiar with the unique Danganronpa titles, check out our reviews of Trigger Happy Havoc  and Goodbye Despair.

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First Gameplay Of Akuma In Street Fighter V, Release Date Shown At PlayStation Experience

We already knew Akuma was headed to Street Fighter V, but this year's PlayStation Experience offered the first look of the Instant Hell-Murdering character in action.

The trailer shows that the character remains mostly as we know him, with a few Street Fighter V-related twists. Rocking a new, lion-esque mane, he retains his Demon Flip, as well as his signature red and diagonal fireballs. His V-Trigger seems to increase the durability of his fireballs, making it easier for him to win at long range against other characters. His Super move from Street Fighter III, Kongou Kokuretsuzan, also makes a return. Finally, it seems like this time, we actually get to see what goes on during his Shun Goku Satsu. It's pretty intense. You can watch the trailer below.

At the end of the trailer, we also got a few additional details. An image teasing the next season of characters for the game emerged, showing a release date of December 20.

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